Search Results

Keywords: University of New England

Historical Items

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Item 51996

St. Francis College, Biddeford, ca. 1955

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: circa 1955 Location: Biddeford Media: Postcard

Item 29175

S. H. McCollester, Westbrook Seminary, ca. 1865

Contributed by: Abplanalp Library, UNE Date: circa 1865 Location: Portland; Westbrook Media: Carte de visite

Item 29178

Dr. J. William Daniels and Westbrook Seminary geometry class, Portland, 1876

Contributed by: Abplanalp Library, UNE Date: 1876 Location: Deering; Portland Media: Photographic print

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 111810

Westbrook Junior College preliminaries, Portland, 1939-1946

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1939–1946 Location: Portland Client: Westbrook Junior College Architect: John Calvin Stevens II

Item 111863

Westbrook Junior College site plans, Portland, 1938-1950

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1938–1950 Location: Portland Client: Westbrook Junior College Architect: John Howard Stevens and John Calvin Stevens II Architects

Item 111865

Westbrook Junior College alterations, Portland, 1939-1950

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1939–1950 Location: Portland Client: Westbrook Junior College Architect: John Howard Stevens and John Calvin Stevens II Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Westbrook Seminary: Educating Women

Westbrook Seminary, built on Stevens Plain in 1831, was founded to educate young men and young women. Seminaries traditionally were a form of advanced secondary education. Westbrook Seminary served an important function in admitting women students, for whom education was less available in the early and mid nineteenth century.

Exhibit

400 years of New Mainers

Immigration is one of the most debated topics in Maine. Controversy aside, immigration is also America's oldest tradition, and along with religious tolerance, what our nation was built upon. Since the first people--the Wabanaki--permitted Europeans to settle in the land now known as Maine, we have been a state of immigrants.

Exhibit

A Brief History of Colby College

Colby originated in 1813 as Maine Literary and Theological Institution and is now a small private liberal arts college of about 1,800 students. A timeline of the history and development of Colby College from 1813 until the present.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Abplanalp Library, UNE

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Mantor Library, University of Maine Farmington

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Acadian Archives

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Coaching in Maine and how to become a good coach
by University of New England

Dr. John Winkin speaks at sports medicine lecture, introduced by Dr. Doug Brown

Story

Dr. Norman Beaupré: Preserving his Franco-American culture
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

Journey growing up as a Franco-American in Biddeford to his career as a professor and author.

Story

Annette Addorio: 100+ years of memories from full life
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

From 1914 to 2018, highlights from my life in Biddeford

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: An American Studies Approach to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was truly a man of his time and of his nation; this native of Portland, Maine and graduate of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine became an American icon. Lines from his poems intersperse our daily speech and the characters of his long narrative poems have become part of American myth. Longfellow's fame was international; scholars, politicians, heads-of-state and everyday people read and memorized his poems. Our goal is to show that just as Longfellow reacted to and participated in his times, so his poetry participated in shaping and defining American culture and literature. The following unit plan introduces and demonstrates an American Studies approach to the life and work of Longfellow. Because the collaborative work that forms the basis for this unit was partially responsible for leading the two of us to complete the American & New England Studies Masters program at University of Southern Maine, we returned there for a working definition of "American Studies approach" as it applies to the grade level classroom. Joe Conforti, who was director at the time we both went through the program, offered some useful clarifying comments and explanation. He reminded us that such a focus provides a holistic approach to the life and work of an author. It sets a work of literature in a broad cultural and historical context as well as in the context of the poet's life. The aim of an American Studies approach is to "broaden the context of a work to illuminate the American past" (Conforti) for your students. We have found this approach to have multiple benefits at the classroom and research level. It brings the poems and the poet alive for students and connects with other curricular work, especially social studies. When linked with a Maine history unit, it helps to place Portland and Maine in an historical and cultural context. It also provides an inviting atmosphere for the in-depth study of the mechanics of Longfellow's poetry. What follows is a set of lesson plans that form a unit of study. The biographical "anchor" that we have used for this unit is an out-of-print biography An American Bard: The story of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, by Ruth Langland Holberg, Thomas Y. Crowell & Company, c1963. Permission has been requested to make this work available as a downloadable file off this web page, but in the meantime, used copies are readily and cheaply available from various vendors. The poem we have chosen to demonstrate our approach is "Paul Revere's Ride." The worksheets were developed by Judy Donahue, the explanatory essays researched and written by the two of us, and our sources are cited below. We have also included a list of helpful links. When possible we have included helpful material in text format, or have supplied site links. Our complete unit includes other Longfellow poems with the same approach, but in the interest of time and space, they are not included. Please feel free to contact us with questions and comments.