Exhibits

Maine Memory Network is featuring these online exhibits. You also can view all of the site's exhibits, view a timeline of selected events in Maine History, and learn how to create your own exhibit.

Northern Threads two dress logo

Northern Threads two dress logo

Northern Threads: Two centuries of dress at Maine Historical

Organized by themed vignettes, Northern Threads shares stories about Maine people, while exploring how the clothing they wore reveals social, economic, and environmental histories. This re-examination of Maine Historical Society's permanent collection is an opportunity to consider the relevance of historic clothing in museums, the ebb and flow of fashion styles, and the complexities of diverse representation spanning 200 years of collecting. Read on.

'Centation' fashion drawing, Paris, 1931

'Centation' fashion drawing, Paris, 1931

Cosmopolitan stylings of Mildred and Madeleine Burrage

Born in Portland, sisters Mildred Giddings Burrage (1890-1983) and Madeleine Burrage (1891-1976) were renowned artists and world travelers. Mildred's experiences studying painting in Paris and Italy, and the sisters' trips to Mexico and Guatemala inspired their artwork and shared passions for cosmopolitan and stylish attire. Housed at Maine Historical Society, The Burrage Papers include selections of original advertising drawings called "line sheets" from Parisian fashion houses dating from 1928 to 1936. Images of Madeleine's gemstone jewelry and Mildred's artwork accompany intimate family photographs of the sisters. Read on.

Wadsworth-Longfellow House, Portland, ca. 1920

Wadsworth-Longfellow House, Portland, ca. 1920

MHS in Pictures: exploring our first 200 years

Two years after separating from Massachusetts, Maine leaders—many who were part of the push for statehood—also separated from Massachusetts Historical Society, creating the Maine Historical Society in 1822. The legislation signed on February 5, 1822 positioned MHS as the third-oldest state dedicated historical organization in the nation. The exhibition features MHS's five locations over the institution's two centuries, alongside images of leaders who have steered the organization through pivotal times. Read on.

MMN Image 108788

Begin Again: reckoning with intolerance in Maine

BEGIN AGAIN explores Maine's historic role, going back 528 years, in crisis that brought about the pandemic, social and economic inequities, and the Black Lives Matter movement in 2020. Read on.

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Maine's Road to Statehood

 William King, Bath,  ca. 1806

While the Missouri Compromise brought Maine into the Union as a free state in 1820, Maine's push for separation from Massachusetts did not begin in 1820, nor was it simply dictated by Congress. Since the founding of the United States, a consistent and longstanding local fight for independence had been underway and was steered by savvy leaders, mercantile pursuits, boundary fights and much more. Read on.

Maine and the Civil War

Sgt. Nelson W. Jones, 3rd Maine Infantry, ca. 1862

Maine's participation in the Civil War is legendary: heroes and heroines, a huge per capita participation rate, nurses, and homefront activities, as well as post-war remembrances. These pages pull together resources from Maine Memory Network and Maine History Online that explore and illuminate aspects of Maine and the Civil War. Read on.

Mercy Hospital

Frances Tryon, Portland, 1946

The Story of Mercy Hospital began in the fall of 1918, with one of the greatest health crisis in the city's history, the pandemic known as the Spanish Influenza. This emergency, along with limited proper hospital facilities in the Portland area, prompted Bishop Walsh to enlist the help of the Sisters of Mercy. This relationship launched Mercy Hospital's commitment to the greater Portland community, through compassionate and high-quality healthcare. Read on.

Home: The Wadsworth-Longfellow House and Portland

Wadsworth-Longfellow House and Store, 1882

When Peleg Wadsworth built his house in 1785, what is now Congress Street in Portland was on the rural outskirts of the community known as Falmouth. The house passed on to other family members and Portland changed around what remained a family home until 1901, when it became a historic house museum. Read on.

More Maine Memory Exhibits