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Keywords: Harding

Historical Items

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Item 6752

President Harding, Poland Spring, 1921

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1921-08-06 Location: Poland Spring Media: Photographic print

Item 20286

George Milford Harding house, Portland, ca. 1880

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1880 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Item 9877

Ella Harding Peffer and daughter, ca. 1912

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1912 Location: Portland Media: Photoprint

Tax Records

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Item 68373

125 Ocean Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Chauncy M. Harding Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 68374

Assessor's Record, 125 Ocean Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Chauncy M. Harding Use: Garage

Item 68376

131 Ocean Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Chauncy M. Harding Use: Dwelling - Single family

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Guarding Maine Rail Lines

Black soldiers served in Maine during World War II, assigned in small numbers throughout the state to guard Grand Trunk rail lines from a possible German attack. The soldiers, who lived in railroad cars near their posts often interacted with local residents.

Exhibit

Presidents and Campaigns

Several Mainers have run for president or vice president, a number of presidents, past presidents, and future presidents have had ties to the state or visited here, and, during campaign season, many presidential candidates and their family members have brought their campaigns to Maine.

Exhibit

Samplers: Learning to Sew

Settlers' clothing had to be durable and practical to hold up against hard work and winters. From the 1700s to the mid 1800s, the women of Maine learned to sew by making samplers.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Thomaston: The Town that Went to Sea - Beniah Harding

Beniah Harding Beniah Harding Interview, Clip One  Three 10th grade students interviewed local resident Beniah C.

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Reed Hardings neighborhood, Hampden, ca. 1833

Reed Hardings neighborhood, Hampden, ca. 1833 Contributed by Maine Historical Society and Maine State Museum Description John Martin of…

Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - Exhibits

We invite you to take a look and you will see all the hard work and long hours that went into creating these projects.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Growing up on a potato and dairy farm
by Paula Woodworth

Life growing up and working on a potato and dairy farm was hard work but fun in Aroostook County.

Story

The future of potato growing
by Dan Blackstone

Informed by six generations of potato farming

Story

Apple Time - a visit to the ancestral farm
by Randy Randall

Memories from childhood of visiting the family homestead in Limington during apple picking time.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie"--Selected Lines and Illustrations

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Maine's native son, is the epitome of Victorian Romanticism. Aroostook County is well acquainted with Longfellow's epic poem, Evangeline, because it is the story of the plight of the Acadians, who were deported from Acadie between 1755 and 1760. The descendants of these hard-working people inhabit much of Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. The students enjoy hearing the story and seeing the ink drawings. The illustrations are my interpretations. The collection took approximately two months to complete. The illustrations are presented in a Victorian-style folio, reminiscent of the family gathered in the parlor for a Sunday afternoon reading of Evangeline, which was published in 1847. Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Have students read "Evangeline A Tale of Acadie". Give a background of the Acadia Diaspora. Suggested Follow-up Activities: Students could illustrate their own poems, as well as other Longfellow poems, such as: "Paul Revere's Ride," "The Village Blacksmith," or "The Children's Hour." "Tales of the Wayside Inn" is a colonial Canterbury Tales. The guest of the inn each tell stories. Student could write or illustrate their own characters or stories. Appropriate calligraphy assignments could include short poems and captions for their illustrations. Inks, pastels, watercolors, and colored pencils would be other appropriate illustrative media that could be applicable to other illustrated poems and stories. Each illustration in this exhibit was made in India ink on file folder paper. The dimensions, including the burgundy-colors mat, are 9" x 12". A friend made the calligraphy.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Birth of An American Hero in "Paul Revere's Ride"

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
The period of American history just prior to the Civil War required a mythology that would celebrate the strength of the individual, while fostering a sense of Nationalism. Longfellow saw Nationalism as a driving force, particularly important during this period and set out in his poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" to arm the people with the necessary ideology to face the oncoming hardships. "Paul Revere's Ride" was perfectly suited for such an age and is responsible for embedding in the American consciousness a sense of the cultural identity that was born during this defining period in American History. It is Longfellow's interpretation and not the actual event that became what Dana Gioia terms "a timeless emblem of American courage and independence." Gioia credits the poem's perseverance to the ease of the poem's presentation and subject matter. "Paul Revere's Ride" takes a complicated historical incident embedded in the politics of Revolutionary America and retells it with narrative clarity, emotional power, and masterful pacing,"(2). Although there have been several movements to debunk "Paul Revere's Ride," due to its lack of historical accuracy, the poem has remained very much alive in our national consciousness. Warren Harding, president during the fashionable reign of debunk criticism, perhaps said it best when he remarked, "An iconoclastic American said there never was a ride by Paul Revere. Somebody made the ride, and stirred the minutemen in the colonies to fight the battle of Lexington, which was the beginning of independence in the new Republic of America. I love the story of Paul Revere, whether he rode or not" (Fischer 337). Thus, "despite every well-intentioned effort to correct it historically, Revere's story is for all practical purposes the one Longfellow created for him," (Calhoun 261). It was what Paul Revere's Ride came to symbolize that was important, not the actual details of the ride itself.