Search Results

Keywords: Bases

Historical Items

View All Showing 2 of 497 Showing 3 of 497

Item 13527

Houlton Army Air Base parachute and operations buildings.

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: 1941 Location: Houlton Media: Photographic print

Item 13519

Houlton Army Air Base Fire House

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: 1941 Location: Houlton Media: Photographic print

Item 105834

Officers Quarters at Houlton Air Base, 1943

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: 1943-01-30 Location: Houlton Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

View All Showing 1 of 1 Showing 1 of 1

Item 50531

67-69 Emery Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: W.H. Base et als Use: Dwelling - Two family

Architecture & Landscape

View All Showing 2 of 10 Showing 3 of 10

Item 109289

Presque Isle Army Air Base NCO Club alterations, Presque Isle, 1944

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1944 Location: Presque Isle Client: Presque Isle Army Air Base Architect: Eaton W. Tarbell

Item 111883

B.S.A. cottage, Chebeague Island, 1936

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1936 Location: Chebeague Island Client: Council B.S.A. Architect: John Calvin Stevens II

Item 109128

Dow Air Force Base, Bangor, 1948-1954

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1948–1954 Location: Bangor Client: United States Air Force Architect: Eaton W. Tarbell

Online Exhibits

View All Showing 2 of 90 Showing 3 of 90

Exhibit

Passing the Time: Artwork by World War II German POWs

In 1944, the US Government established Camp Houlton, a prisoner of war (POW) internment camp for captured German soldiers during World War II. Many of the prisoners worked on local farms planting and harvesting potatoes. Some created artwork and handicrafts they sold or gave to camp guards. Camp Houlton processed and held about 3500 prisoners and operated until May 1946.

Exhibit

Navy Firefighting School, Little Chebeague Island

Little Chebeague Island in Casco Bay was home to recreational facilities and a firefighting school for WWII sailors. The school was part of a Navy effort to have non-firefighting personnel knowledgeable in dealing with shipboard fires.

Exhibit

Student Exhibit: Rebecca Sophie Clarke

Sophie May, whose real name was Rebecca Clarke, was the author of over 40 books between 1861 and 1903. She wrote the "Little Prudy Series" based on the little town of Norridgewock.

Site Pages

View All Showing 2 of 116 Showing 3 of 116

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Titcomb Ski Slope, Farmington, ca. 1950

… Ski Slope including the building / lodge at the base of the slope. Note that this ski slope is on Morrison Hill and not on Titcomb Hill.

Site Page

Presque Isle Air Museum

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Presque Isle: The Star City - Governor's Potato Plot, Presque Isle, 1959

… being installed at the Presque Isle Air Force Base and was a great source of pride for the community.

My Maine Stories

View All Showing 2 of 37 Showing 3 of 37

Story

Hooch Mum and my Vietnam service
by Jim Barrows

A poem about being a medic, saving Vietnamese people and babies. Sometimes we trusted too much.

Story

Growing up in Lewiston
by Kathy Becvar

Growing up in Lewiston in the 1960s and 1970s.

Story

Father Renald Labarre: the life of a Catholic priest
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

A Biddeford native provides insights on his Franco-American roots and life as a Catholic priest.

Lesson Plans

View All Showing 2 of 8 Showing 3 of 8

Lesson Plan

Portland History: Construction, Preservation and Restoration of the Portland Observatory

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
Included here are activities based in economics, mathematics, physics, social studies, civics and language arts. Students can debate the issues surrounding preservation and urban development as well as the changing value of money.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The American Wilderness? How 19th Century American Artists Viewed the Separation Of Civilization and Nature

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
When European settlers began coming to the wilderness of North America, they did not have a vision that included changing their lifestyle. The plan was to set up self-contained communities where their version of European life could be lived. In the introduction to The Crucible, Arthur Miller even goes as far as saying that the Puritans believed the American forest to be the last stronghold of Satan on this Earth. When Roger Chillingworth shows up in The Scarlet Letter's second chapter, he is welcomed away from life with "the heathen folk" and into "a land where iniquity is searched out, and punished in the sight of rulers and people." In fact, as history's proven, they believed that the continent could be changed to accommodate their interests. Whether their plans were enacted in the name of God, the King, or commerce and economics, the changes always included – and still do to this day - the taming of the geographic, human, and animal environments that were here beforehand. It seems that this has always been an issue that polarizes people. Some believe that the landscape should be left intact as much as possible while others believe that the world will inevitably move on in the name of progress for the benefit of mankind. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby – a book which many feel is one of the best portrayals of our American reality - the narrator, Nick Carraway, looks upon this progress with cynicism when he ends his narrative by pondering the transformation of "the fresh green breast of a new world" that the initial settlers found on the shores of the continent into a modern society that unsettlingly reminds him of something out of a "night scene by El Greco." Philosophically, the notions of progress, civilization, and scientific advancement are not only entirely subjective, but also rest upon the belief that things are not acceptable as they are. Europeans came here hoping for a better life, and it doesn't seem like we've stopped looking. Again, to quote Fitzgerald, it's the elusive green light and the "orgiastic future" that we've always hoped to find. Our problem has always been our stoic belief system. We cannot seem to find peace in the world either as we've found it or as someone else may have envisioned it. As an example, in Miller's The Crucible, his Judge Danforth says that: "You're either for this court or against this court." He will not allow for alternative perspectives. George W. Bush, in 2002, said that: "You're either for us or against us. There is no middle ground in the war on terror." The frontier -- be it a wilderness of physical, religious, or political nature -- has always frightened Americans. As it's portrayed in the following bits of literature and artwork, the frontier is a doomed place waiting for white, cultured, Europeans to "fix" it. Anything outside of their society is not just different, but unacceptable. The lesson plan included will introduce a few examples of 19th century portrayal of the American forest as a wilderness that people feel needs to be hesitantly looked upon. Fortunately, though, the forest seems to turn no one away. Nature likes all of its creatures, whether or not the favor is returned. While I am not providing actual activities and daily plans, the following information can serve as a rather detailed explanation of things which can combine in any fashion you'd like as a group of lessons.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine in the News: World War I Newspaper Project

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan is designed to introduce students to the important role that Maine played in World War I. Students will act as investigators in order to learn about the time period as well as the active role that Maine took on.