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Keywords: shares

Historical Items

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Item 99254

Dixfield Centre Cheese Factory Co. shares, Dixfield, 1875

Contributed by: Dixfield Historical Society Date: 1875-06-26 Location: Dixfield Media: Paper and black ink

Item 188

Share certificate, Portland Monument Ground, 1807

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1807-10-01 Location: Portland Media: Color transparency

Item 17659

Andrew Dexter letter to William King, 1806

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1806 Location: Bath; Boston Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 111663

York Institute, Saco, 1926

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1925–1926 Location: Saco Client: York Institute Architect: John Calvin Stevens and John Howard Stevens Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Patriotism Shared

Post office clerks began collecting strong red, white, and blue string, rolling it onto a ball and passing it on to the next post office to express their support for the Union effort in the Civil War. Accompanying the ball was this paper scroll on which the clerks wrote messages and sometimes drew images.

Exhibit

Elise Fellows White: World Traveling Violin Prodigy

Elise Fellows White was a violinist from Skowhegan who traveled all over the world to share her music.

Exhibit

Northern Threads: Two centuries of dress at Maine Historical

Organized by themed vignettes, Northern Threads shares stories about Maine people, while exploring how the clothing they wore reveals social, economic, and environmental histories. This re-examination of Maine Historical Society's permanent collection is an opportunity to consider the relevance of historic clothing in museums, the ebb and flow of fashion styles, and the complexities of diverse representation spanning 200 years of collecting.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Cumberland & North Yarmouth - Our Shared History - Page 4 of 4

Our Shared History Schools: A Community Value Dunn School studentsNorth Yarmouth Historical Society Education of our young people has always…

Site Page

Cumberland & North Yarmouth - Our Shared History - Page 3 of 4

Our Shared History Separate yet Similar Riverside Farm, North YarmouthNorth Yarmouth Historical Society Agricultural Roots By the midpoint in…

Site Page

Cumberland & North Yarmouth - Our Shared History - Page 2 of 4

… Our Shared History Cumberland Congregational ChurchCumberland Historical Society Succession of Secession Role of the Church Parishes In…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Share your COVID-19 story for future generations
by Steve Bromage and Jamie Rice, Maine Historical Society

Learn how you can share your stories on Maine Memory Network

Story

Alex Mouzas: Passionate about sharing his Greek-American roots
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

A personal, in-depth look into the life and contributions of area Greek-Americans

Story

Alice Bertrand shares highlights from her 100+ years
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

What is it like to live through all the events that have occurred in the past 100+ years?

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Portland History: "My Lost Youth" - Longfellow's Portland, Then and Now

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow loved his boyhood home of Portland, Maine. Born on Fore Street, the family moved to his maternal grandparents' home on Congress Street when Henry was eight months old. While he would go on to Bowdoin College and travel extensively abroad, ultimately living most of his adult years in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he never forgot his beloved Portland. Years after his childhood, in 1855, he wrote "My Lost Youth" about his undiminished love for and memories of growing up in Portland. This exhibit, using the poem as its focus, will present the Portland of Longfellow's boyhood. In many cases the old photos will be followed by contemporary images of what that site looked like 2004. Following the exhibit of 68 slides are five suggested lessons that can be adapted for any grade level, 3–12.

Lesson Plan

An Exploration into Maine's History

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Social Studies
This investigation was designed to utilize the resources of the Maine Memory Network and the Library of Congress. Students will have the opportunity to create their own albums from MMN, research their local history, and that of the state of Maine. This is a progressive approach that begins with an investigation into Yarmouth, Maine’s history, however, it could easily be adapted for any home town. Part of the exploration includes suggested visits to the local historical society and discussions with the school historian. The creative writing piece calls for students to become someone who lived in their town 100 years ago; they find the information they need be research on MMN and the Library of Congress and then write and share their stories. Along each step of the way, students created, saved, and shared albums of materials related to their research and work on MMN. The second part of this lesson is designed to coincide with the study of the history of the state of Maine and of the United States.

Lesson Plan

Portland History: Lemuel Moody and the Portland Observatory

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Social Studies
Lemuel Moody and the Portland Observatory Included are interesting facts to share with your students and for students, an interactive slide show available on-line at Maine Memory Network. The "Images" slide show allows students to place historical images of the Observatory in a timeline. Utilizing their observation skills students will place these images in chronological order by looking for changes within the built environment for clues. Also available is the "Maps" slide show, a series of maps from key eras in Portland's history. Students will answer the questions in the slide show to better understand the topography of Portland, the need for an Observatory and the changes in the landscape and the population centers.