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Keywords: radicalism

Historical Items

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Item 20723

Ku Klux Klan, Hodgdon, ca. 1924

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: circa 1924 Location: Hodgdon Media: Photographic print

Item 10228

Letter from William Lloyd Garrison to Elizabeth Mountfort, July 19, 1850

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1850-07-19 Location: Portland; Boston Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 10233

Parker Pillsbury letter to Elizabeth Mountfort, 1850

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1850-08-05 Location: Portland Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Debates Over Suffrage

While numerous Mainers worked for and against woman suffrage in the state in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, some also worked on the national level, seeking a federal amendment to allow women the right to vote

Exhibit

A Soldier's Declaration of Independence

William Bayley of Falmouth (Portland) was a soldier in the Continental Army, seeing service at Ticonderoga, Valley Forge, Monmouth Court House, and Saratoga, among other locations. His letters home to his mother reveal much about the economic hardships experienced by both soldiers and those at home.

Exhibit

World War I and the Maine Experience

With a long history of patriotism and service, Maine experienced the war in a truly distinct way. Its individual experiences tell the story of not only what it means to be an American, but what it means to be from Maine during the war to end all wars.

Site Pages

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Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Intro: pages 129-142

Martin strongly disliked Greeley, a former Radical Republican, because Martin believed Greeley was giving in to demands and interests of the former…

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - George Melvin Weston, Bangor, ca. 1867

… The text bubble above Western reads, "The radicals must be put down or we go into another civil war.

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Dr. George W. Ladd, Bangor, ca. 1866

… Andrew Johnson and that Ladd said, "if the radicals refuse to admit our representatives to Congress" Johnson would "place them there by arms."…

My Maine Stories

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Story

One of the first abstract painters in Maine
by William Manning

I have grown as a painter in ways I might not have if I moved to New York

Story

Rematriation
by Alivia Moore

Our shared future for all people in Wabanakiyik calls us to rematriate.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Meets German Radical Poet Ferdinand Freiligrath

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
During Longfellow's 1842 travels in Germany he made the acquaintance of the politically radical Ferdinand Freiligrath, one of the influential voices calling for social revolution in his country. It is suggested that this association with Freiligrath along with his return visit with Charles Dickens influenced Longfellow's slavery poems. This essay traces Longfellow's interest in the German poet, Freiligrath's development as a radical poetic voice, and Longfellow's subsequent visit with Charles Dickens. Samples of verse and prose are provided to illustrate each writer's social conscience.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries - The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?