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Keywords: navigation

Historical Items

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Item 13553

Brass binnacle and compass, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Museum at Portland Head Date: circa 1900 Media: Brass

Item 25338

Ship certificate, 1928

Contributed by: Hamlin Memorial Library and Museum Date: 1928 Location: Oakland; Brisbane Media: Ink on paper

Item 16419

Wood Island Lighthouse, Biddeford, 1944

Contributed by: Friends of Wood Island Lighthouse Date: 1944-03-01 Location: Biddeford Media: Photographic print

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 111235

Passamaquoddy Bay tidal power development, 1935

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1935 Location: Eastport Client: Passamaquoddy Tidal Power Project Architect: John Calvin Stevens and John Howard Stevens Architects

Item 111598

David A. Calhoun house, Cape Elizabeth, 1904

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1904 Location: Cape Elizabeth Client: David A. Calhoun Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Harry Lyon: An Old Sea Dog Takes to the Air

Through a chance meeting, Harry Lyon of Paris Hill became the navigator on the 1928 flight of the Southern Cross, the first trans-Pacific flight. His skill as a navigator, despite his lack of experience, was a key factor on the flight's success.

Exhibit

Moosehead Steamboats

After the canoe, steamboats became the favored method of transportation on Moosehead Lake. They revolutionized movement of logs and helped promote tourism in the region.

Exhibit

The Schooner Bowdoin: Ninety Years of Seagoing History

After traveling to the Arctic with Robert E. Peary, Donald B. MacMillan (1874-1970), an explorer, researcher, and lecturer, helped design his own vessel for Arctic exploration, the schooner <em>Bowdoin,</em> which he named after his alma mater. The schooner remains on the seas.

Site Pages

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Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Site Navigation Tips

Site Navigation Tips "Representing every particular" is an introduction to John Martin and the five volumes of his writings and illustrations…

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Seaport on the Kennebec

… with capable officers and crews, established a Navigation School at the Academy to teach advanced mathematics to boys who wished to pursue careers…

Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Welcome

… situated at the head of the Penobscot River’s navigable waters. Bangor has, from its beginnings, been the “center” of Maine in many ways.

My Maine Stories

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Story

John Conroy: proud heir of a 4-generation business
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

The evolution of a family business providing funeral services

Story

Cantor Beth & Dr David Strassler: personal insights on life
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

The journey of a couple devoted to each other, their family, their community and their religion

Story

Sister Viola Lausier: Finance Director with a big heart
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

A life dedicated to applying financial and leadership expertise in the service of others.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries - The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?