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Keywords: kindness

Historical Items

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Item 6190

Rosemary Cottage, Eliot, c. 1880

Contributed by: Eliot Baha'i Archives Date: circa 1885 Location: Eliot Media: Photographic print

Item 5486

Rebecca Usher account of Abraham Lincoln visit, Virginia, ca. 1870

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1865 Location: City Point; Hollis Center Media: Paper

  view a full transcription

Item 17671

Be Kind to Animals Week, Portland, 1927

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media Date: 1927 Location: Portland Media: Glass Negative

Tax Records

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Item 37310

158 Commercial Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: James H McDonald Use: Store & Storage

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Capt. Grenville F. Sparrow, 17th Maine

Grenville F. Sparrow of Portland was 25 when he answered Lincoln's call for more troops to fight the Confederates. He enlisted in Co. A of Maine's 17th Volunteer Infantry regiment. He fought in 30 battles between 1862 and the war's end in 1865.

Exhibit

Yarmouth: Leader in Soda Pulp

Yarmouth's "Third Falls" provided the perfect location for papermaking -- and, soon, for producing soda pulp for making paper. At the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th, Yarmouth was an international leader in soda pulp production.

Exhibit

Rebecca Usher: 'To Succor the Suffering Soldiers'

Rebecca Usher of Hollis was 41 and single when she joined the Union nursing service at the U.S. General Hospital at Chester, Pennsylvania. Her time there and later at City Point, Virginia, were defining experiences of her life.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Blue Hill, Maine - Farmer

This watercolor picture of three kinds of hogs is done in Fisher's typical straightforward style.

Site Page

Blue Hill, Maine - Craftsman

This white wooden box has simple lines and form and is an example of the kinds of boxes he made and sold to add to the family's finances.

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Farmington's First Grist Mill

… be milled into flour, which greatly increased the kinds of food the settlers ate, as well as allowed them to store the flour for later use.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Beef Cutlet always reminds me of home in Iran
by Parivash Rohani

Making beef cutlet in Maine connects me to my home in Iran and my Baha'i faith.

Story

Swimming with Jellyfish
by Cathy. L

At the age of 19 Cathy attended an Audubon Camp at Hog Island.

Story

The gift of a necklace
by Parivash Rohani

When I was born my grandmother gave me a part of a Baha’i prayer for protection.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Longfellow's poem "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport" opens up the issue of the earliest history of the Jews in America, and the significant roles they played as businessmen and later benefactors to the greater community. The history of the building itself is notable in terms of early American architecture, its having been designed, apparently gratis, by the most noted architect of the day. Furthermore, the poem traces the history of Newport as kind of a microcosm of New England commercial cities before the industrialization boom. For almost any age student the poem could be used to open up interest in local cemeteries, which are almost always a wealth of curiousities and history. Longfellow and his friends enjoyed exploring cemeteries, and today our little local cemeteries can be used to teach little local histories and parts of the big picture as well. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow visited the Jewish cemetery in Newport, RI on July 9, 1852. His popular poem about the site, published two years later, was certainly a sympathetic portrayal of the place and its people. In addition to Victorian romantic musings about the "Hebrews in their graves," Longfellow includes in this poem references to the historic persecution of the Jews, as well as very specific references to their religious practices. Since the cemetery and the nearby synagogue were restored and protected with an infusion of funding just a couple years after Longfellow's visit, and later a congregation again assembled, his gloomy predictions about the place proved false (never mind the conclusion of the poem, "And the dead nations never rise again!"). Nevertheless, it is a fascinating poem, and an interesting window into the history of the nation's oldest extant synagogue.