Search Results

Keywords: War Ships

Historical Items

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Item 19107

Bar Harbor with War Ships

Contributed by: Jesup Memorial Library Date: circa 1910 Location: Bar Harbor Media: Postcard

Item 40309

Camouflaged ships, Casco Bay, 1918

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1918 Media: Watercolor on paper

Item 50314

Tug of war, Portland, 1920

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media Date: 1920-07-01 Location: Portland Media: Glass Negative

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Prisoners of War

Mainers have been held prisoners in conflicts fought on Maine and American soil and in those fought overseas. In addition, enemy prisoners from several wars have been brought to Maine soil for the duration of the war.

Exhibit

Great War and Armistice Day

In 1954, November 11 became known as Veterans Day, a time to honor American veterans of all wars. The holiday originated, however, as a way to memorialize the end of World War I, November 11, 1918, and to "perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations." Mainers were involved in World War I as soldiers, nurses, and workers on the homefront aiding the military effort.

Exhibit

World War I and the Maine Experience

With a long history of patriotism and service, Maine experienced the war in a truly distinct way. Its individual experiences tell the story of not only what it means to be an American, but what it means to be from Maine during the war to end all wars.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Highlighting Historical Hampden - Ships

Ships 'Katherine May,' Hampden, 1919 Item 28033 infoHampden Historical Society

Site Page

Highlighting Historical Hampden - Ships

Ships The schooner Victory, Hampden, ca. 1898 Item 28115 infoHampden Historical Society

Site Page

Highlighting Historical Hampden - War of 1812

Both American ships burned in the Penobscot at Hampden, either set afire by their own crews or by the British.

My Maine Stories

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Story

The only letter to survive World War II
by Cyrene Slegona

Only one of many letters my father sent to his wife remained after he came home from World War II.

Story

My father, Earle Ahlquist, served during World War II
by Earlene Chadbourne

Earle Ahlquist used his Maine common sense during his Marine service and to survive Iwo Jima

Story

Learning to fly and instructing cadets at West Point during WWII
by Vera Cleaves

West Point during World War II

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries: The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?