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Keywords: Vessels

Historical Items

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Item 33740

Two schooners towed by tug "Joseph W. Baker" up Saco River, ca. 1910

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: circa 1910 Location: Biddeford; Saco Media: Photographic print

Item 33739

Three-masted vessel being towed down Saco River by tug "Joseph W. Baker", ca. 1910

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: circa 1910 Location: Biddeford; Saco Media: Photographic print

Mystery Corner Item

Item 13379

Mud bucket, Portland Company, ca. 1920

Mystery Corner Item Who's in the mud bucket?

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1920 Location: Portland; Boston Media: Photographic print

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Cape Elizabeth Shipwrecks

The rocky coastline of Cape Elizabeth has sent many vessels to their watery graves.

Exhibit

Launch of the 'Doris Hamlin'

The Doris Hamlin, a four-masted schooner built at the Frye-Flynn Shipyard in Harrington, was one of the last vessels launched there, marking the decline of a once vigorous shipbuilding industry in Washington County.

Exhibit

The Schooner Bowdoin: Ninety Years of Seagoing History

After traveling to the Arctic with Robert E. Peary, Donald B. MacMillan (1874-1970), an explorer, researcher, and lecturer, helped design his own vessel for Arctic exploration, the schooner <em>Bowdoin,</em> which he named after his alma mater. The schooner remains on the seas.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Blue Hill, Maine - Friendship vessel, Blue Hill, 1907

Friendship vessel, Blue Hill, 1907 Contributed by Blue Hill Public Library Description A sailing vessel named Friendship in Blue Hill.

Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - Shipbuilding

From 1845-1856 records show the building of 40 vessels--an average of 3.33 per year. The following eight years (1857-1864) saw only nine vessels

Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - Shipbuilding

These coastal vessels sailed up and down the Atlantic seaboard, through the Caribbean and the West Indies--some even made it around Cape Horn to wind…

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries: The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?