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Keywords: Trade

Historical Items

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Item 10638

Board of Trade Building, Portland, 1907

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1907 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Item 102510

Aroostook Board of Trade organizes potato donation, Caribou, 1914

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1914-11-16 Location: Bangor; Caribou Media: Ink on paper

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Item 29005

W.G. Webber Drugstore Trade card, Bath, ca. 1895

Contributed by: Patten Free Library Date: circa 1895 Location: Bath Media: Ink on paper

Tax Records

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Item 50770

32-34 Exchange Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Board of Trade Building Assn. Use: Office

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Indians, Furs, and Economics

When Europeans arrived in North America and disrupted traditional Native American patterns of life, they also offered other opportunities: trade goods for furs. The fur trade had mixed results for the Wabanaki.

Exhibit

Big Timber: the Mast Trade

Britain was especially interested in occupying Maine during the Colonial era to take advantage of the timber resources. The tall, straight, old growth white pines were perfect for ships' masts to help supply the growing Royal Navy.

Exhibit

"We are growing to be somewhat cosmopolitan..." Waterville, 1911

Between 1870 and 1911, Waterville more than doubled in size, becoming a center of manufacturing, transportation, and the retail trade and offering a variety of entertainments for its residents.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Lincoln, Maine - W.A. Brown: Jack of all trades

W.A. Brown: Jack of all trades Responses from students in Mr. Koscuiszka's class can be viewed below: Amanda McIntyre "Research your topic and…

Site Page

City of Brewer

Brewer is the gateway to coastal communities and Acadia National Park. The city along with Bangor also serves as a trading and distribution center for the coastal areas and towns and cities to the north with the total region having a population of approximately 250,000 people.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Learn how you can help! Contact Us

… Historic Hallowell c/o Hallowell Area Board of Trade PO Box 246 Hallowell, ME 04347 You may leave a message at the Hallowell Info Phone, a service…

My Maine Stories

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Story

A Lifelong Romance with Retail
by George A Smith

Maine's once plentiful small retail stores.

Story

Portland Bars: Carlo's and Boothby Square
by anonymous

Carlo Giobbi on his family's Portland Bars: Carlo's and Boothby Square

Story

The best lobster roll in Maine!
by Debbie Gagnon

The history of Red's Eats and the recipe for our famous Lobster Rolls

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries - The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?