Search Results

Keywords: Symbols.

Historical Items

View All Showing 2 of 129 Showing 3 of 129

Item 25963

Savings Bond drive, Augusta, 1950

Contributed by: Margaret Chase Smith Library Date: 1950 Location: Augusta Media: Photographic print

Item 105596

Maine Militia Flag, ca. 1822

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1820 Media: Silk

Item 5281

Sarah Mitchell and Mary Newell at the Maine Centennial, Portland, 1920

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media Date: 1920 Location: Portland Media: Glass Negative

Online Exhibits

View All Showing 2 of 41 Showing 3 of 41

Exhibit

A Day for Remembering

Most societies have had rituals or times set aside to honor ancestors, those who have died and have paved the way for the living. Memorial Day, the last Monday in May, is the day Americans have set aside for such remembrances.

Exhibit

Designing Acadia

For one hundred years, Acadia National Park has captured the American imagination and stood as the most recognizable symbol of Maine’s important natural history and identity. This exhibit highlights Maine Memory content relating to Acadia and Mount Desert Island.

Exhibit

Evergreens and a Jolly Old Elf

Santa Claus and evergreens have been common December additions to homes, schools, businesses, and other public places to America since the mid nineteenth century. They are two symbols of the Christian holiday of Christmas whose origins are unrelated to the religious meaning of the day.

Site Pages

View All Showing 2 of 14 Showing 3 of 14

Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Main Street, Bangor, ca. 1945

… was also Maine’s largest department store and a symbol of Maine’s strong retail climate. Unable to compete with the new Bangor Mall, Freese's…

Site Page

Thomaston: The Town that Went to Sea - Architect James Overlock

He popularized the inverted fleur-de-lis symbol, using it lavishly in side porches, an Italianate architectural element.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Groups, Clubs & Organizations - Page 1 of 3

A blindfold statue symbolizes the passage from outer darkness to inner light, and trade implements have mystical and symbolic meaning.

My Maine Stories

View All Showing 2 of 5 Showing 3 of 5

Story

The Journey Home
by Gina Brooks

I am a Maliseet artist from the St. Mary’s First Nation, my work is about our connection to the land

Story

Wampum Belts
by Donald Soctomah

My great grandfather was a wampum keeper

Story

My Africa Book and living in Portland
by Titi de Baccarat

My art is about being an immigrant in the US, my pain, fear, uncertainty, and hope for my future

Lesson Plans

View All Showing 2 of 6 Showing 3 of 6

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

How Do Communities Represent Themselves

Grade Level: K-2 Content Area: Social Studies
Students learn about historical and current flags of Maine and work in small groups to create flags to represent their classroom/school communities.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Why is Maine the Pine Tree State?

Grade Level: K-2 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students in early elementary grades a foundation for identifying the recognizable animals and natural resources of Maine. In this lesson, students will learn about and identify animals and plants significant to the state, and will identify what types of environments are best suited to different types of plant and animal life. Students will have the opportunity to put their own community wildlife into a large-scale perspective.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

What Remains: Learning about Maine Populations through Burial Customs

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
This lesson plan will give students an overview of how burial sites and gravestone material culture can assist historians and archaeologists in discovering information about people and migration over time. Students will learn how new scholarship can help to dispel harmful archaeological myths, look into the roles of religion and ethnicity in early Maine and New England immigrant and colonial settlements, and discover how to track changes in population and social values from the 1600s to early 1900s based on gravestone iconography and epitaphs.