Search Results

Keywords: Sustainability

Historical Items

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Item 75230

Madawaska Training School canning list, Fort Kent, 1944-1947

Contributed by: Blake Library Special Collections Date: circa 1947 Location: Fort Kent Media: Ink on paper

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Item 75231

Madawaska Training School farm maps, 1948-1949

Contributed by: Blake Library Special Collections Date: 1948–1949 Location: Fort Kent Media: Text with maps

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Item 75219

Madawaska Training School livestock certificate, Fort Kent, 1942

Contributed by: Blake Library Special Collections Date: 1942 Location: Fort Kent; Fairfield Media: Paper with attached black and white photographs

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Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

From French Canadians to Franco-Americans

French Canadians who emigrated to the Lewiston-Auburn area faced discrimination as children and adults -- such as living in "Little Canada" tenements and being ridiculed for speaking French -- but also adapted to their new lives and sustained many cultural traditions.

Exhibit

Maine Eats: the food revolution starts here

From Maine's iconic lobsters, blueberries, potatoes, apples, and maple syrup, to local favorites like poutine, baked beans, red hot dogs, Italian sandwiches, and Whoopie Pies, Maine's identity and economy are inextricably linked to food. Sourcing food, preparing food, and eating food are all part of the heartbeat of Maine's culture and economy. Now, a food revolution is taking us back to our roots in Maine: to the traditional sources, preparation, and pleasures of eating food that have sustained Mainers for millennia.

Exhibit

Land Claims, Economic Opportunities?

The landmark 1980 Maine Indian Land Claims Settlement Act provided $81.6 million to Maine Indians for economic development, land purchase and other purposes. The money and increased land holdings, however, have not solved economic and employment issues for Maine Indians.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Swan's Island: Six miles east of ordinary - Welcome to Swan's Island!

… a living history of the industries that have sustained its residents over the centuries. Join us as we explore the twists and turns of these island…

Site Page

Maine Forest Service

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Circus swing, Boston, 1853

… of the boys leg at 2 say 7 feet the boy at 2 sustaining him without breaking his leg." View additional information about this item on the Maine…

My Maine Stories

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Story

A New Beginning for Wabanaki Land Relationships
by John Banks

Wabanaki leadership in land stewardship

Story

Sarah Redmond Seaweed Farmer
by Sarah Redmond

Sarah explains the importance of seaweed and how she became a seaweed farmer

Story

Welimahskil: Sweet grass
by Suzanne Greenlaw

Weaving Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and western science around Sweetgrass

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.