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Keywords: Revolutionary war

Historical Items

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Item 14034

Revolutionary War Time Cannon Ball

Contributed by: Bucksport Historical Society Date: circa 1776 Location: Bucksport Media: Iron

Item 81326

Memorial Service for Revolutionary War Veteran, Monson, 1954

Contributed by: Monson Historical Society Date: 1954-08-29 Location: Monson Media: Photographic print

Item 102156

Joseph Hewes on Revolutionary War intellegence, Philadelphia, 1776

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1776-03-26 Location: Philadelphia Media: Ink on paper

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Exhibits

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Exhibit

World War I and the Maine Experience

With a long history of patriotism and service, Maine experienced the war in a truly distinct way. Its individual experiences tell the story of not only what it means to be an American, but what it means to be from Maine during the war to end all wars.

Exhibit

Scarborough: They Answered the Call

Scarborough met every quota set by the state for supplying Civil War soldiers for Union regiments. Some of those who responded became prominent citizens of the town.

Exhibit

The Life and Legacy of the George Tate Family

Captain George Tate, mast agent for the King of England from 1751 to the Revolutionary War, and his descendants helped shape the development of Portland (first known as Falmouth) through activities such as commerce, shipping, and real estate.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - IV. Engulfed by nationalism: Revolutionary Biddeford

IV. Engulfed by nationalism: Revolutionary Biddeford J.G. Deering & Son Lumber Co., Biddeford, ca.

Site Page

Early Maine Photography - War

… Collection, the images of two aged Revolutionary War veterans are contrasted with those of several young men who served in the Civil War. Simon…

Site Page

Early Maine Photography - War - Page 1 of 2

… of early photography are daguerreotypes of Revolutionary War soldiers Conrad Heyer of Waldoboro and the Reverend John Sawyer of Bangor.

My Maine Stories

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Story

An allegory about the Vietnam war
by Bill Hinderer

An allegory about my service in the Vietnam War

Story

My life as a revolutionary knitter
by Katharine Cobey

Moving to Maine and confronting knitting stereotypes

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Primary Sources: Maine Women's Causes and Influence before 1920

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students the opportunity to read and analyze letters, literature, and other primary documents and articles of material culture from the MHS collections relating to the women of Maine between the end of the Revolutionary War through the national vote for women’s suffrage in 1920. Students will discuss issues including war relief (Civil War and World War I), suffrage, abolition, and temperance, and how the women of Maine mobilized for or in some cases helped to lead these movements.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Primary Sources: Daily Life in 1820

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students the opportunity to explore and analyze primary source documents from the years before, during, and immediately after Maine became the 23rd state in the Union. Through close looking at documents, objects, and art from Maine during and around 1820, students will ask questions and draw informed conclusions about life at the time of statehood.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Birth of An American Hero in "Paul Revere's Ride"

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
The period of American history just prior to the Civil War required a mythology that would celebrate the strength of the individual, while fostering a sense of Nationalism. Longfellow saw Nationalism as a driving force, particularly important during this period and set out in his poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" to arm the people with the necessary ideology to face the oncoming hardships. "Paul Revere's Ride" was perfectly suited for such an age and is responsible for embedding in the American consciousness a sense of the cultural identity that was born during this defining period in American History. It is Longfellow's interpretation and not the actual event that became what Dana Gioia terms "a timeless emblem of American courage and independence." Gioia credits the poem's perseverance to the ease of the poem's presentation and subject matter. "Paul Revere's Ride" takes a complicated historical incident embedded in the politics of Revolutionary America and retells it with narrative clarity, emotional power, and masterful pacing,"(2). Although there have been several movements to debunk "Paul Revere's Ride," due to its lack of historical accuracy, the poem has remained very much alive in our national consciousness. Warren Harding, president during the fashionable reign of debunk criticism, perhaps said it best when he remarked, "An iconoclastic American said there never was a ride by Paul Revere. Somebody made the ride, and stirred the minutemen in the colonies to fight the battle of Lexington, which was the beginning of independence in the new Republic of America. I love the story of Paul Revere, whether he rode or not" (Fischer 337). Thus, "despite every well-intentioned effort to correct it historically, Revere's story is for all practical purposes the one Longfellow created for him," (Calhoun 261). It was what Paul Revere's Ride came to symbolize that was important, not the actual details of the ride itself.