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Keywords: Law enforcement

Historical Items

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Item 9535

Letter about living conditions in Aroostook County, ca. 1845

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1845 Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 6037

Police siren, Portland, ca. 1820

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1820 Location: Portland Media: Wood, iron

Item 6957

Deputy sheriff helmet, ca. 1870

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1870 Media: Metal, leather, canvas

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 116320

Capt. John Deering house, 1884-1919

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1884–1919 Location: Portland; Portland; Kennebunkport Client: John W. Deering Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Hunting Season

Maine's ample woods historically provided numerous game animals and birds for hunters seeking food, fur, or hides. The promotion of hunting as tourism and concerns about conservation toward the end of the nineteenth century changed the nature of hunting in Maine.

Exhibit

Clean Water: Muskie and the Environment

Maine Senator Edmund S. Muskie earned the nickname "Mr. Clean" for his environment efforts during his tenure in Congress from 1959 to 1980. He helped created a political coalition that passed important clean air and clean water legislation, drawing on his roots in Maine.

Exhibit

Hannibal Hamlin of Paris Hill

2009 marked the bicentennials of the births of Abraham Lincoln and his first vice president, Hannibal Hamlin of Maine. To observe the anniversary, Paris Hill, where Hamlin was born and raised, honored the native statesman and recalled both his early life in the community and the mark he made on Maine and the nation.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Rum, Riot, and Reform - Politics and Enforcement

The Liquor Enforcement Commission, an arm of state government, hired deputies (known as Sturgis Men) to track down offending citizens and…

Site Page

Rum, Riot, and Reform - Quenching the Thirst

… how major communities enforced or failed to enforce liquor laws. Bunker found Bangor "the one place east of Boston where you can enter a gilded…

Site Page

Rum, Riot, and Reform - 1919 to 1934: The Nation Follows Maine Into Prohibition

The Volstead or Prohibition Enforcement Act, passed by Congress on October 28, went into effect with Prohibition.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Mike Remillard shares his in-depth knowledge of our community
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

You will learn a lot from Mike's fascination with many topics from church organs to submarines.

Story

Used, Abused, Battered, and Confused
by Anonymous (Maine Correctional Center)

The experience of domestic violence and the criminal justice system in Maine

Story

Senator Susan Deschambault: not afraid to take on challenges
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center Voices of Biddeford project

Honoring her family's small business roots and community service through her own unconventional path

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries - The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?