Search Results

Keywords: Individuals

Historical Items

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Item 15881

John Lovett

Contributed by: Bucksport Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Bucksport Media: Photographic print

Item 21189

Calais Street Railway Car #2, Calais

Contributed by: St. Croix Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Calais Media: Photographic print

Item 102883

Class of 1910, Lincoln Academy, Newcastle, 1910

Contributed by: An individual through Lincoln Academy Date: 1910 Location: Newcastle Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

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Item 55461

945-953 Forest Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Estate of William P. Goss Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 55470

Assessor's Record, 945-953 Forest Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Estate of William P. Goss Use: Auto Repair Shop

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 110460

Garland Farm, ca. 1955-1990

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1955–1990 Client: Lewis Garland, Architect: Landscape Design Associates

Item 111982

Winthrop Library, Winthrop, 1916

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1916 Location: Winthrop Client: unknown Architect: John Calvin Stevens and John Howard Stevens Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Doing Good: Medical Stories of Maine

Throughout Maine’s history, individuals have worked to improve and expand medical care, not only for the health of those living in Maine, but for many around the world who need care and help.

Exhibit

World War I and the Maine Experience

With a long history of patriotism and service, Maine experienced the war in a truly distinct way. Its individual experiences tell the story of not only what it means to be an American, but what it means to be from Maine during the war to end all wars.

Exhibit

War Through the Eyes of a Young Sailor

Eager to deal with the "Sesech" [Secessionists], young deepwater sailor John Monroe Dillingham of Freeport enlisted in the U.S. Navy as soon as he returned from a long voyage in 1862. His letters and those of his family offer first-hand insight into how one individual viewed the war.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Maine and the Civil War - Individuals: Stories, Letters, Diaries

Individuals: Stories, Letters, Diaries

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Hallowell's Volunteer Fireman's Budget

Webber, Sr., an individual partner The Hallowell's Fire Department's budget, volunteer program, and daily functioning have changed over the years.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - The Boston Flint Company

Webber, Sr., an individual partner The Sandpaper Mill was built onto the other part of the Boston Flint Company in 1880.

My Maine Stories

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Story

What did I do during the Covid quarantine?
by Nasser Rohani from Baha'i Community

Individuals response to Covid and social distancing.

Story

Maine and the Atlantic World Slave Economy
by Seth Goldstein

How Maine's historic industries are tied to slavery

Story

Alex Mouzas: Passionate about sharing his Greek-American roots
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

A personal, in-depth look into the life and contributions of area Greek-Americans

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Birth of An American Hero in "Paul Revere's Ride"

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
The period of American history just prior to the Civil War required a mythology that would celebrate the strength of the individual, while fostering a sense of Nationalism. Longfellow saw Nationalism as a driving force, particularly important during this period and set out in his poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" to arm the people with the necessary ideology to face the oncoming hardships. "Paul Revere's Ride" was perfectly suited for such an age and is responsible for embedding in the American consciousness a sense of the cultural identity that was born during this defining period in American History. It is Longfellow's interpretation and not the actual event that became what Dana Gioia terms "a timeless emblem of American courage and independence." Gioia credits the poem's perseverance to the ease of the poem's presentation and subject matter. "Paul Revere's Ride" takes a complicated historical incident embedded in the politics of Revolutionary America and retells it with narrative clarity, emotional power, and masterful pacing,"(2). Although there have been several movements to debunk "Paul Revere's Ride," due to its lack of historical accuracy, the poem has remained very much alive in our national consciousness. Warren Harding, president during the fashionable reign of debunk criticism, perhaps said it best when he remarked, "An iconoclastic American said there never was a ride by Paul Revere. Somebody made the ride, and stirred the minutemen in the colonies to fight the battle of Lexington, which was the beginning of independence in the new Republic of America. I love the story of Paul Revere, whether he rode or not" (Fischer 337). Thus, "despite every well-intentioned effort to correct it historically, Revere's story is for all practical purposes the one Longfellow created for him," (Calhoun 261). It was what Paul Revere's Ride came to symbolize that was important, not the actual details of the ride itself.