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Keywords: Indian baskets

Historical Items

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Item 10050

Penobscot band basket, Indian Island, ca. 1880

Contributed by: Hudson Museum, Univ. of Maine Date: circa 1880 Location: Old Town Media: Ash, dyes

Item 104440

Josie Moriarty selling baskets, Indian Island, ca. 1930

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1930 Location: Indian Island Media: Postcard

Item 105016

Penobscot baskets, Portland, 1923

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media Date: 1923 Location: Portland; Old Town Media: Glass plate

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Indians at the Centennial

Passamaquoddy Indians from Washington County traveled to Portland in 1920 to take part in the Maine Centennial Exposition. They set up an "Indian Village" at Deering Oaks Park.

Exhibit

Gifts From Gluskabe: Maine Indian Artforms

According to legend, the Great Spirit created Gluskabe, who shaped the world of the Native People of Maine, and taught them how to use and respect the land and the resources around them. This exhibit celebrates the gifts of Gluskabe with Maine Indian art works from the early nineteenth to mid twentieth centuries.

Exhibit

Gluskap of the Wabanaki

Creation and other cultural tales are important to framing a culture's beliefs and values -- and passing those on. The Wabanaki -- Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot -- Indians of Maine and Nova Scotia tell stories of a cultural hero/creator, a giant who lived among them and who promised to return.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - The Indian Encampment

… Wabanaki village to peruse and purchase handmade baskets and a host of other wares. In addition to goods that could be carried away in hand, some…

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - The Indian Encampment: Behind the Scenes

The Indian Encampment: Behind the Scenes Indian encampment, Bar Harbor, 1881Abbe Museum All the cooking at the Indian encampment is done…

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Wabanaki Today

The Festival is a market for selling baskets and other Wabanaki crafts, but it is also an opportunity for tribal members from far reaching…

My Maine Stories

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Story

The Tomah Basket
by James Boyce

Learning to make Maliseet Tomah baskets

Story

Why environmental advocacy is critical for making baskets
by Jennifer Sapiel Neptune

My advocacy work for the Maine Indian Basketmakers Alliance

Story

The story behind David Moses Bridges' basket
by Patricia Ayala Rocabado

The story behind David Moses Bridges' (1962-2017) birch bark basket

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.