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Keywords: Independence

Historical Items

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Item 34722

Dunlap Declaration of Independence, 1776

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1776-07-04 Location: Philadelphia Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 102146

John Adams to Joseph Palmer on absolute independence from Britain, Philadelphia, 1774

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1774-09-26 Location: Philadelphia; Quincy Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 6049

North Yarmouth Copy of the Declaration of Independence

Contributed by: Maine State Archives Date: 1776-07-04 Location: Philadelphia Media: Paper

Exhibits

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Exhibit

A Soldier's Declaration of Independence

William Bayley of Falmouth (Portland) was a soldier in the Continental Army, seeing service at Ticonderoga, Valley Forge, Monmouth Court House, and Saratoga, among other locations. His letters home to his mother reveal much about the economic hardships experienced by both soldiers and those at home.

Exhibit

Unlocking the Declaration's Secrets

Fewer than 30 copies of the first printing of the Declaration of Independence are known to exist. John Dunlap hurriedly printed copies for distribution to assemblies, conventions, committees and military officers. Authenticating authenticity of the document requires examination of numerous details of the broadside.

Exhibit

Independence and Challenges: The Life of Hannah Pierce

Hannah Pierce (1788-1873) of West Baldwin, who remained single, was the educated daughter of a moderately wealthy landowner and businessman. She stayed at the family farm throughout her life, operating the farm and her various investments -- always in close touch with her siblings.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - Overview: Road to Statehood

… a consistent and longstanding local fight for independence had been underway and was steered by savvy leaders, mercantile pursuits, boundary fights…

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - The American Revolution and Early Attempts at Separation - Page 1 of 2

… at Separation Overwhelmingly dedicated to independence from Britain, Mainers quieted any murmurs of separation during the American Revolution.

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - After the War: The First Victory for Separationists

… to the United States took precedent over an independent Maine. Item Contributed byMaine Historical Society The War of 1812 proved a trying time…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Service in Bosnia, Iraq and Afghanistan by MAJ Adam R. Cote
by Adam R. Cote

Military Service has had a deep impact my life

Story

A Maine Family's story of being Prisoners of War in Manila
by Nicki Griffin

As a child, born after the war, I would hear these stories - glad they were finally written down

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Birth of An American Hero in "Paul Revere's Ride"

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
The period of American history just prior to the Civil War required a mythology that would celebrate the strength of the individual, while fostering a sense of Nationalism. Longfellow saw Nationalism as a driving force, particularly important during this period and set out in his poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" to arm the people with the necessary ideology to face the oncoming hardships. "Paul Revere's Ride" was perfectly suited for such an age and is responsible for embedding in the American consciousness a sense of the cultural identity that was born during this defining period in American History. It is Longfellow's interpretation and not the actual event that became what Dana Gioia terms "a timeless emblem of American courage and independence." Gioia credits the poem's perseverance to the ease of the poem's presentation and subject matter. "Paul Revere's Ride" takes a complicated historical incident embedded in the politics of Revolutionary America and retells it with narrative clarity, emotional power, and masterful pacing,"(2). Although there have been several movements to debunk "Paul Revere's Ride," due to its lack of historical accuracy, the poem has remained very much alive in our national consciousness. Warren Harding, president during the fashionable reign of debunk criticism, perhaps said it best when he remarked, "An iconoclastic American said there never was a ride by Paul Revere. Somebody made the ride, and stirred the minutemen in the colonies to fight the battle of Lexington, which was the beginning of independence in the new Republic of America. I love the story of Paul Revere, whether he rode or not" (Fischer 337). Thus, "despite every well-intentioned effort to correct it historically, Revere's story is for all practical purposes the one Longfellow created for him," (Calhoun 261). It was what Paul Revere's Ride came to symbolize that was important, not the actual details of the ride itself.