Search Results

Keywords: High School Students

Historical Items

View All Showing 2 of 497 Showing 3 of 497

Item 67537

Cover of Mussul Unsquit Yearbook, Strong High School, 1923

Contributed by: Mr. & Mrs. Roger Lambert through Strong Historical Society Date: 1923 Location: Strong Media: Ink on paper

Item 23360

Staff of Biddeford High School Olympian, 1924

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: 1924 Location: Biddeford Media: Photographic print

Item 35422

John Bapst High School athletic patch, Bangor, ca. 1970

Contributed by: John Bapst Memorial High School Date: circa 1970 Location: Bangor Media: Fabric

Architecture & Landscape

View All Showing 1 of 1 Showing 1 of 1

Item 116618

Forest Street Grammar School, Westbrook, 1894

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1894 Location: Westbrook Client: unknown Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Online Exhibits

View All Showing 2 of 57 Showing 3 of 57

Exhibit

John Bapst High School

John Bapst High School was dedicated in September 1928 to meet the expanding needs of Roman Catholic education in the Bangor area. The co-educational school operated until 1980, when the diocese closed it due to decreasing enrollment. Since then, it has been a private school known as John Bapst Memorial High School.

Exhibit

Reading, Writing and 'Rithmetic: Brooklin Schools

When Brooklin, located on the Blue Hill Peninsula, was incorporated in 1849, there were ten school districts and nine one-room school houses. As the years went by, population changes affected the location and number of schools in the area. State requirements began to determine ways that student's education would be handled. Regardless, education of the Brooklin students always remained a high priority for the town.

Exhibit

Away at School: Letters Home

Young men and women in the 19th century often went away from home -- sometimes for a few months, sometimes for longer periods -- to attend academies, seminaries, or schools run by individuals. While there, they wrote letters home, reporting on boarding arrangements and coursework undertaken, and inquired about the family at home.

Site Pages

View All Showing 2 of 141 Showing 3 of 141

Site Page

John Bapst Memorial High School

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Guilford, Maine - Guilford Schools

Both the grade school and high school were decked out with buntings and other festive decorations for the town of Guilford’s Centennial celebration.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Hallowell Schools

High School, Hallowell, ca. 1900Hubbard Free Library Young factory workers (like people who worked at the local Hallowell cotton mills and shoe…

My Maine Stories

View All Showing 2 of 8 Showing 3 of 8

Story

Bob Hodge:A rocky road to become Biddeford school superintendent
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

The son of immigrants, Bob's hard work and determination leads to a life of community service.

Story

Quinton "Skip" Wilson: different aspects of "standing out"
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

Recollections of life as Biddeford's only student of color during the 1960-70s

Story

My service in Afghanistan with the Marines and my life today
by Nicholas Krier

My service in Afghanistan with the Marines

Lesson Plans

View All Showing 2 of 15 Showing 3 of 15

Lesson Plan

Immigration: The Not So Open Door

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Learn about immigration in the United States using primary sources from Maine Memory Network and the Library of Congress.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine in the News: World War I Newspaper Project

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan is designed to introduce students to the important role that Maine played in World War I. Students will act as investigators in order to learn about the time period as well as the active role that Maine took on.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow's "The Village Blacksmith" and "Whitman's Song of Myself" - Alternative Constructions of the American Worker

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Most if not all of us have or will need to work in the American marketplace for at least six decades of our lives. There's a saying that I remember a superintendent telling a group of graduating high-school seniors: remember, when you are on your deathbed, you will not be saying that you wish you had spent more time "at the office." But Americans do spend a lot more time working each year than nearly any other people on the planet. By the end of our careers, many of us will have spent more time with our co-workers than with our families. Already in the 21st century, much has been written about the "Wal-Martization" of the American workplace, about how, despite rocketing profits, corporations such as Wal-Mart overwork and underpay their employees, how workers' wages have remained stagnant since the 1970s, while the costs of college education and health insurance have risen out of reach for many citizens. It's become a cliché to say that the gap between the "haves" and the "have nots" is widening to an alarming degree. In his book Wealth and Democracy, Kevin Phillips says we are dangerously close to becoming a plutocracy in which one dollar equals one vote. Such clashes between employers and employees, and between our rhetoric of equality of opportunity and the reality of our working lives, are not new in America. With the onset of the industrial revolution in the first half of the nineteenth century, many workers were displaced from their traditional means of employment, as the country shifted from a farm-based, agrarian economy toward an urban, manufacturing-centered one. In cities such as New York, groups of "workingmen" (early manifestations of unions) protested, sometimes violently, unsatisfactory labor conditions. Labor unions remain a controversial political presence in America today. Longfellow and Whitman both wrote with sympathy about the American worker, although their respective portraits are strikingly different, and worth juxtaposing. Longfellow's poem "The Village Blacksmith" is one of his most famous and beloved visions: in this poem, one blacksmith epitomizes characteristics and values which many of Longfellow's readers, then and now, revere as "American" traits. Whitman's canto (a section of a long poem) 15 from "Song of Myself," however, presents many different "identities" of the American worker, representing the entire social spectrum, from the crew of a fish smack to the president (I must add that Whitman's entire "Song of Myself" is actually 52 cantos in length). I do not pretend to offer these single texts as all-encompassing of the respective poets' ideas about workers, but these poems offer a starting place for comparison and contrast. We know that Longfellow was the most popular American poet of the nineteenth century, just as we know that Whitman came to be one of the most controversial. Read more widely in the work of both poets and decide for yourselves which poet speaks to you more meaningfully and why.