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Keywords: Congress

Historical Items

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Item 104406

Congress Street, Portland, 1921

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media Date: 1921 Location: Portland Media: Glass Negative

Item 75599

Congress Street at Forest Avenue, Portland, ca. 1933

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1933 Location: Portland Media: Postcard

Item 11516

Congress Street, Portland, ca. 1915

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1915 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

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Item 38931

551 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Congress Realty Co. Use: Stores & Restaurants

Item 38966

Assessor's Record, 601 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Congress Realty Co. Use: Mercantile

Item 38964

595-601 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Congress Realty Co. Use: Mercantile

Exhibits

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Exhibit

John Hancock's Relation to Maine

The president of the Continental Congress and the Declaration's most notable signatory, John Hancock, has ties to Maine through politics, and commercial businesses, substantial property, vacations, and family.

Exhibit

Clean Water: Muskie and the Environment

Maine Senator Edmund S. Muskie earned the nickname "Mr. Clean" for his environment efforts during his tenure in Congress from 1959 to 1980. He helped created a political coalition that passed important clean air and clean water legislation, drawing on his roots in Maine.

Exhibit

Amazing! Maine Stories

These stories -- that stretch from 1999 back to 1759 -- take you from an amusement park to the halls of Congress. There are inventors, artists, showmen, a railway agent, a man whose civic endeavors helped shape Portland, a man devoted to the pursuit of peace and one known for his military exploits, Maine's first novelist, a woman who recorded everyday life in detail, and an Indian who survived a British attack.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - The Coasting Law of 1789

The law, passed by the United States Congress, forced ships along the coast to port and register at each state with which it did not share a boarder.

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - The Final Vote

… Crawford, passed a revised Coasting Law through Congress, which turned the entire eastern seaboard into one district and thus avoided the economic…

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - Maine in the 17th Century

… separation from Massachusetts began long before Congress approved its request for statehood 1820. It began in the early 17th century, when…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Portland in the 1940s
by Carol Norton Hall

As a young woman in Portland during WWII, the presence of servicemen was life changing.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine's quest for statehood began in the years immediately following the American Revolution. Though the state of Massachusetts consented to the separation in 1819 and Maine would ultimately achieve statehood in 1820, Maine’s split from Massachusetts was not without controversy and was not universally supported by people living in Maine. Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: It is in the best interests of the people of Maine for Maine to become its own state.

Lesson Plan

World War I and the U.S. Home Front

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Learn about World War I using primary sources from Maine Memory Network and the Library of Congress.