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Keywords: Commercial

Historical Items

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Item 13766

Commercial Street, Portland, ca. 1890

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1890 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Item 20506

Commercial Street, Portland, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Item 20509

Commercial Block, Portland, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

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Item 37302

144 Commercial Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Clinton W. Davis Agent Use: Shop - Junk

Item 37326

214-220 Commercial Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Percival P. Baxter Agent Use: Shop - Junk

Item 86328

Commercial Wharf, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Clinton W Davis Agent

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 116434

Hannaford Brothers Warehouse, Portland, 1919-1920

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1919–1920 Location: Portland Client: Hannaford Brothers Company Architect: John Calvin Stevens and John Howard Stevens Architects

Item 109538

Commercial Block for G.M. Coombs, Auburn, 1891

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1891 Location: Auburn Client: George M. Coombs Architect: George M. Coombs

Item 111800

Richardson Wharf Company alterations, Portland, 1922

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1922 Location: Portland Client: Richardson Wharf Co. Architect: John Calvin Stevens and John Howard Stevens Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

John Hancock's Relation to Maine

The president of the Continental Congress and the Declaration's most notable signatory, John Hancock, has ties to Maine through politics, and commercial businesses, substantial property, vacations, and family.

Exhibit

Taber Wagon

The Taber farm wagon was an innovative design that was popular on New England farms. It made lifting potato barrels onto a wagon easier and made more efficient use of the horse's work. These images glimpse the life work of its inventor, Silas W. Taber of Houlton, and the place of his invention in the farming community

Exhibit

The World's Largest Oxen

Named for the two largest things in Maine at the turn of the 20th century, Mt. Katahdin and Granger of Stetson, were known as the Largest Oxen in the World. Unable to do farm work because of their size, they visited fairs and agricultural events around the Northeast.

Site Pages

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Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Bangor Commercial article on World's Fair contest

… article on World's Fair contest   Bangor Commercial article on World's Fair contest The Bangor Commercial newspaper ran a contest in 1893…

Site Page

Bath's Historic Downtown - The Railroad Station

… just south of downtown at the south end of Commercial Street, was built in 1941. The new station was constructed completely out of brick, as…

Site Page

Bath's Historic Downtown - History Overview

… as the lowest of these areas were filled in and Commercial Street was added to the east of Front Street, the landscape of the downtown expanded…

My Maine Stories

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Story

30 years of business in Maine
by Raj & Bina Sharma

30 years of business, raising a family, & showcasing our culture in Maine

Story

How Mom caught Dad
by Jane E. Woodman

How Ruth and Piney met in Wilton and started a life together

Story

Canadian immigrant founds worlds largest paper company in 1898
by Hugh J. Chisholm

Hugh J. Chisholm founded International Paper, which was the world's largest paper company in 1898.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Longfellow's poem "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport" opens up the issue of the earliest history of the Jews in America, and the significant roles they played as businessmen and later benefactors to the greater community. The history of the building itself is notable in terms of early American architecture, its having been designed, apparently gratis, by the most noted architect of the day. Furthermore, the poem traces the history of Newport as kind of a microcosm of New England commercial cities before the industrialization boom. For almost any age student the poem could be used to open up interest in local cemeteries, which are almost always a wealth of curiousities and history. Longfellow and his friends enjoyed exploring cemeteries, and today our little local cemeteries can be used to teach little local histories and parts of the big picture as well. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow visited the Jewish cemetery in Newport, RI on July 9, 1852. His popular poem about the site, published two years later, was certainly a sympathetic portrayal of the place and its people. In addition to Victorian romantic musings about the "Hebrews in their graves," Longfellow includes in this poem references to the historic persecution of the Jews, as well as very specific references to their religious practices. Since the cemetery and the nearby synagogue were restored and protected with an infusion of funding just a couple years after Longfellow's visit, and later a congregation again assembled, his gloomy predictions about the place proved false (never mind the conclusion of the poem, "And the dead nations never rise again!"). Nevertheless, it is a fascinating poem, and an interesting window into the history of the nation's oldest extant synagogue.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride Companion Curriculum

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
These lesson plans were developed by Maine Historical Society for the Seashore Trolley Museum as a companion curriculum for the historical fiction YA novel "Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride" by Jean. M. Flahive (2019). The novel tells the story of Millie Thayer, a young girl who dreams of leaving the family farm, working in the city, and fighting for women's suffrage. Millie's life begins to change when a "flying carpet" shows up in the form of an electric trolley that cuts across her farm and when a fortune-teller predicts that Millie's path will cross that of someone famous. Suddenly, Millie finds herself caught up in events that shake the nation, Maine, and her family. The lesson plans in this companion curriculum explore a variety of topics including the history of the trolley use in early 20th century Maine, farm and rural life at the turn of the century, the story of Theodore Roosevelt and his relationship with Maine, WWI, and the flu pandemic of 1918-1920.