Search Results

Keywords: Center

Historical Items

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Item 105540

Maine Medical Center construction, Portland, 1955

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1955-02-18 Location: Portland Media: photographic print

Item 105541

Maine Medical Center staff tours, Portland, 1956

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1956 Location: Portland Media: photographic print

Item 9162

Maine Medical Center telephone service, Portland, 1959

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1959 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

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Item 36659

49 Center Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Felice Giampetruzzi Use: Dwelling & Store

Item 36661

51 Center Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Bridget Green Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 36664

61 Center Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Estate of Mathias Flaherty Use: Dwelling - Three Family

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 109321

Bangor Civic Center, Bangor, 1977

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1977 Location: Bangor Client: Bangor Civic Center Architect: Eaton W. Tarbell

Item 111500

Unity of Portland plan for expansion, Windham, 1991-1994

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1991–1994 Location: Windham; Portland Client: Unity Spiritual Center of Portland Architect: Carol A. Wilson; Carol A. Wilson, Architect

Item 110435

Kanzeon Zen Center, Bar Harbor, 1988-1989

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1988–1989 Location: Bar Harbor Client: Kanzeon Board Architect: Patrick Chasse; Landscape Design Associates

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Maine Medical Center, Bramhall Campus

Maine Medical Center, founded as Maine General Hospital, has dominated Portland’s West End since its construction in 1871 on Bramhall Hill. As the medical field grew in both technological and social practice, the facility of the hospital also changed. This exhibit tracks the expansion and additions to that original building as the hospital adapted to its patients’ needs.

Exhibit

The Advent of Green Acre, A Baha'i Center of Learning

The Green Acre Baha'i School began as Green Acre Conferences, established by Sarah Jane Farmer in Eliot. She later became part of the Baha'i Faith and hosted speakers and programs that promoted peace. In 1912, the leader of the Baha'i Faith, 'Abdu'l-Baha, visited Green Acre, where hundreds saw him speak.

Exhibit

Doing Good: Medical Stories of Maine

Throughout Maine’s history, individuals have worked to improve and expand medical care, not only for the health of those living in Maine, but for many around the world who need care and help.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Life Story Center

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Maine Medical Center Archives

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Maine Irish Heritage Center

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Crystal Priest - Genesis of 1:1 in Guilford
by MLTI Stories of Impact Project

Crystal Priest recounted the genesis of 1:1 near the geographical center of the state--Guilford.

Story

A tour of unique features at St. Andre's Catholic Church
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

A tour of unique features at St. Andre's Catholic Church

Story

Maine in Vietnam - Not to be Forgotten
by Karen L. Olson, M.D.

How Veterans' Voices started.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Writer's Hour - "Footprints on the Sands of Time"

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
These lessons will introduce the world-famous American writer and a selection of his work with a compelling historical fiction theme. Students take up the quest: Who was HWL and did his poetry leave footprints on the sands of time? They will "tour" his Cambridge home through young eyes, listen, and discuss poems from a writer’s viewpoint, and create their own poems inspired by Longfellow's works. The interdisciplinary approach utilizes critical thinking skills, living history, technology integration, maps, photos, books, and peer collaboration. The mission is to get students keenly interested in what makes a great writer by using Longfellow as a historic role model. The lessons are designed for students at varying reading levels. Slow learners engage in living history with Alice’s fascinating search through the historic Craigie house, while gifted and talented students may dramatize the virtual tour as a monologue. Constant discovery and exciting presentations keep the magic in lessons. Remember that, "the youthful mind must be interested in order to be instructed." Students will build strong writing skills encouraging them to leave their own "footprints on the sands of time."

Lesson Plan

Portland History: Lemuel Moody and the Portland Observatory

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Social Studies
Lemuel Moody and the Portland Observatory Included are interesting facts to share with your students and for students, an interactive slide show available on-line at Maine Memory Network. The "Images" slide show allows students to place historical images of the Observatory in a timeline. Utilizing their observation skills students will place these images in chronological order by looking for changes within the built environment for clues. Also available is the "Maps" slide show, a series of maps from key eras in Portland's history. Students will answer the questions in the slide show to better understand the topography of Portland, the need for an Observatory and the changes in the landscape and the population centers.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow's "The Village Blacksmith" and "Whitman's Song of Myself" - Alternative Constructions of the American Worker

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Most if not all of us have or will need to work in the American marketplace for at least six decades of our lives. There's a saying that I remember a superintendent telling a group of graduating high-school seniors: remember, when you are on your deathbed, you will not be saying that you wish you had spent more time "at the office." But Americans do spend a lot more time working each year than nearly any other people on the planet. By the end of our careers, many of us will have spent more time with our co-workers than with our families. Already in the 21st century, much has been written about the "Wal-Martization" of the American workplace, about how, despite rocketing profits, corporations such as Wal-Mart overwork and underpay their employees, how workers' wages have remained stagnant since the 1970s, while the costs of college education and health insurance have risen out of reach for many citizens. It's become a cliché to say that the gap between the "haves" and the "have nots" is widening to an alarming degree. In his book Wealth and Democracy, Kevin Phillips says we are dangerously close to becoming a plutocracy in which one dollar equals one vote. Such clashes between employers and employees, and between our rhetoric of equality of opportunity and the reality of our working lives, are not new in America. With the onset of the industrial revolution in the first half of the nineteenth century, many workers were displaced from their traditional means of employment, as the country shifted from a farm-based, agrarian economy toward an urban, manufacturing-centered one. In cities such as New York, groups of "workingmen" (early manifestations of unions) protested, sometimes violently, unsatisfactory labor conditions. Labor unions remain a controversial political presence in America today. Longfellow and Whitman both wrote with sympathy about the American worker, although their respective portraits are strikingly different, and worth juxtaposing. Longfellow's poem "The Village Blacksmith" is one of his most famous and beloved visions: in this poem, one blacksmith epitomizes characteristics and values which many of Longfellow's readers, then and now, revere as "American" traits. Whitman's canto (a section of a long poem) 15 from "Song of Myself," however, presents many different "identities" of the American worker, representing the entire social spectrum, from the crew of a fish smack to the president (I must add that Whitman's entire "Song of Myself" is actually 52 cantos in length). I do not pretend to offer these single texts as all-encompassing of the respective poets' ideas about workers, but these poems offer a starting place for comparison and contrast. We know that Longfellow was the most popular American poet of the nineteenth century, just as we know that Whitman came to be one of the most controversial. Read more widely in the work of both poets and decide for yourselves which poet speaks to you more meaningfully and why.