Search Results

Keywords: 17th century

Historical Items

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Item 10292

Broad axe, Alna, ca. 1800

Contributed by: Davistown Museum Date: circa 1800 Location: Alna Media: Forged Iron

Item 4269

Captain Grenville F. Sparrow coat, ca. 1864

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1864 Media: Wool, cotton, brass

Item 7489

Nova Anglia, Novum Belgium et Virginia, ca. 1642

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1642 Media: Map, ink on paper

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Indians, Furs, and Economics

When Europeans arrived in North America and disrupted traditional Native American patterns of life, they also offered other opportunities: trade goods for furs. The fur trade had mixed results for the Wabanaki.

Exhibit

Holding up the Sky: Wabanaki people, culture, history, and art

Learn about Native diplomacy and obligation by exploring 13,000 years of Wabanaki residence in Maine through 17th century treaties, historic items, and contemporary artworks—from ash baskets to high fashion. Wabanaki voices contextualize present-day relevance and repercussions of 400 years of shared histories between Wabanakis and settlers to their region.

Exhibit

The Devil and the Wilderness

Anglo-Americans in northern New England sometimes interpreted their own anxieties about the Wilderness, their faith, and their conflicts with Native Americans as signs that the Devil and his handmaidens, witches, were active in their midst.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - Maine in the 17th Century

Maine in the 17th Century Map of New England, New York, ca. 1676 Largely an unexplored territory by European settlers, 17th century Maine…

Site Page

Surry by the Bay - History of Surry

… it this spirit was alive and well early in the 17th century, when potential settlers first sailed up the pretty little bay searching for a safe…

Site Page

Bath's Historic Downtown - Lincoln Block

He built the Bath Bank in 1810 and died on June 17th, 1852. Francis Henry Fassett was born June 25, 1823.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries: The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?