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Keywords: Sailing

Site Pages

These sites were created for each contributing partner or as part of collaborative community projects through Maine Memory. Learn about collaborative projects on MMN.


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Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Bryant-Rockefeller

… 21570 infoTrenton Cemetery & Keeping Society This is a photograph of Donald Bryant seated on the Rockefeller's sailing sloop, "Jack Tar II".

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Blue Hill, Maine - Friendship vessel, Blue Hill, 1907

… Blue Hill Public Library Description A sailing vessel named Friendship in Blue Hill. View additional information about this item on the…

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Thomaston: The Town that Went to Sea - Shipbuilding During and after the Civil War - 1861 to 1900

Sail damage was guaranteed in the horrendous storms in passages around Cape Horn. The sail loft they built in 1875 still stands in its original…

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Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Maine Granite Industry-Hall Quarry

Duck is the best sail material but is more expensive-17 cents more a yard. When steam came around it made shipping a lot easier so they no longer had…

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Thomaston: The Town that Went to Sea - Shipbuilding Industry Expands - 1850 to 1857

Sails were cut and sewn at the sail lofts of Washburn & Sons and William Campbell. Shipyard owners and builders, Robinson, McCallum and Counce, sold…

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Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Bryant-Rockefeller

… of Donald Bryant at the helm of the Rockefeller's sailing sloop, "Jack Tar II", accompanied by Peggy Rockefeller.

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Thomaston: The Town that Went to Sea - The Carr O'Brien Block

… building has served as a bank, commercial shops, sail loft, boot and shoe factory, clothing factory, and now houses the Prison Showroom, a retail…

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Biddeford History & Heritage Project - Shipbuilding

Shaw" was the last large sailing vessel built on the Saco River. She traveled to Barbados on her first voyage and was owned in Biddeford for several…

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Historic Hallowell - Transportation Challenge

The Jeremiah T. Smith, pictured below drying sails at granite wharf, was named after a Connecticut oyster king and skippered by Captain Lyman W.

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Biddeford History & Heritage Project - Shipbuilding

These coastal vessels sailed up and down the Atlantic seaboard, through the Caribbean and the West Indies--some even made it around Cape Horn to wind…

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Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Twentieth-Century Community Life

… Society Islanders still fished, but instead of sailing to Labrador, they stayed more local. Foremost, of course, were lobsters, but other…

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Historic Hallowell - Industrial Recources

The ships also needed sails so that they could move. As they progressed in technology, the ships relied more on oil and an engine than wind power.