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Keywords: tradition

Historical Items

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Item 6406

Kennebec River, South Gardiner, ca. 1883

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1883 Location: South Gardiner Media: Ink on paper

Item 14292

Senior Spring, Good Will Farm, 1918

Contributed by: L.C. Bates Museum / Good Will-Hinckley Homes Date: 1918 Location: Fairfield Media: Photographic print

Item 105624

Ancestral canoe journey, Motahkomikuk (Indian Township), 2019

Courtesy of Donald Soctomah, an individual partner Date: 2019 Location: Indian Township; Pleasant Point Media: Digital

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Shaarey Tphiloh, Portland's Orthodox Synagogue

Shaarey Tphiloh was founded in 1904 by immigrants from Eastern Europe. While accommodating to American society, the Orthodox synagogue also has retained many of its traditions.

Exhibit

Indians, Furs, and Economics

When Europeans arrived in North America and disrupted traditional Native American patterns of life, they also offered other opportunities: trade goods for furs. The fur trade had mixed results for the Wabanaki.

Exhibit

From French Canadians to Franco-Americans

French Canadians who emigrated to the Lewiston-Auburn area faced discrimination as children and adults -- such as living in "Little Canada" tenements and being ridiculed for speaking French -- but also adapted to their new lives and sustained many cultural traditions.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Lubec, Maine - McCurdy Herring Smokehouse - Page 1 of 4

It was a traditional process carried out in traditional buildings with traditional tools and implements.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Early Performance

… to get by without sacrificing their rich cultural traditions, some began to market themselves as native tour guides and Indian entertainers…

Site Page

Lubec, Maine - McCurdy Herring Smokehouse - Page 2 of 4

1975Item Contributed byLubec Historical Society Preparing smoked herring was a traditional process, that is, one that changed little in its…

My Maine Stories

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Story

The tradition of lobstering
by Sadie Samuels

I learned to fish from my Dad and will lobster the rest of my life

Story

John Conroy: proud heir of a 4-generation business
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

The evolution of a family business providing funeral services

Story

Ted Truman (Throumoulos): A treasure trove of stories
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

A son of Greek immigrants’ insight into his entrepreneurial family, culture and life experiences

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow's Ripple Effect: Journaling With the Poet - "The Song of Hiawatha"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
This lesson is part of a series of six lesson plans that will give students the opportunity to become familiar with the works of Longfellow while reflecting upon how his works speak to their own experiences.