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Keywords: studio

Historical Items

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Item 9759

Philpot's Studio, Sanford, 1903

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: circa 1903 Location: Sanford Media: Photographic print

Item 9460

F. E. Stanley, Lewiston, ca. 1882

Contributed by: Stanley Museum Date: circa 1882 Location: Lewiston Media: Photographic print

Item 1273

Bogdanove studio, Monhegan, 1935

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1935-07-21 Location: Monhegan Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

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Item 38592

510-512 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Martha Abbott Use: Stores - Studio - Beauty Parlor

Item 84516

226-228 Westbrook Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Lillian M. Parker Use: Studio and Dwelling

Item 38958

588 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Devisees of Anna B. Tolford Use: Store & Picture Frming Studio

Exhibits

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Exhibit

People, Pets & Portraits

Informal family photos often include family pets -- but formal, studio portraits and paintings also often feature one person and one pet, in formal attire and pose.

Exhibit

Eternal Images: Photographing Childhood

From the earliest days of photography doting parents from across Maine sought to capture images of their young children. The studio photographs often reflect the families' images of themselves and their status or desired status.

Exhibit

Drawing Together: Art of the Longfellows

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow is best know as a poet, but he also was accomplished in drawing and music. He shared his love of drawing with most of his siblings. They all shared the frequent activity of drawing and painting with their children. The extended family included many professional as well as amateur artists, and several architects.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Early Maine Photography - Studio Portraits

Studio Portraits Studio Portrait Slideshow Click on image for full slideshow Beginning the 1840s, photographers sought to make the connection…

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Mildred Thomas and Harold Sawyer, ca. 1910

Harold was the son of Charles Sawyer who had a studio in Farmington from 1904-1920. His handpainted photographs were very popular.

Site Page

Early Maine Photography - Art - Page 2 of 2

… portraiture by using painted backgrounds in their studios. A tintype shows a formally posed young woman set against a classical railing and trees…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Scientist Turned Artist Making Art Out of Trash
by Ian Trask

Bowdoin College alum returns to midcoast Maine to make environmentally conscious artwork

Story

One View
by Karen Jelenfy

My life as an artist in Maine.

Story

How Mom caught Dad
by Jane E. Woodman

How Ruth and Piney met in Wilton and started a life together

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.