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Keywords: neighbors

Historical Items

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Item 11944

Visiting neighbors in an Early Stanley Steamer, Lexington, 1906

Contributed by: Stanley Museum Date: 1906 Location: Lexington Twp. Media: Photographic print

Item 102244

Work crew for Town Clerk's house, Westport Island, 1952

Contributed by: Calvin Cromwell through Westport Island History Committee Date: 1952 Location: Westport Island Media: Photographic print

Item 104894

Sarah Tibbetts news about neighbors to John Tibbetts, Westport Island, 1895

Contributed by: Westport Island History Committee Date: 1895-05-05 Location: Westport Island Media: Ink on paper

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Architecture & Landscape

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Item 111316

The Checkley House, Scarborough, 1895

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1895 Location: Scarborough Client: unknown Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Item 111491

Isaacson residence floor plan and presentation drawing, Lewiston, 1960

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1960 Location: Lewiston Client: Philip Isaacson Architect: F. Frederick Bruck; F. Frederick Bruck, Architect

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Independence and Challenges: The Life of Hannah Pierce

Hannah Pierce (1788-1873) of West Baldwin, who remained single, was the educated daughter of a moderately wealthy landowner and businessman. She stayed at the family farm throughout her life, operating the farm and her various investments -- always in close touch with her siblings.

Exhibit

Home Ties: Sebago During the Civil War

Letters to and from Sebago soldiers who served in the Civil War show concern on both sides about farms and other issues at home as well as concern from the home front about soldiers' well-being.

Exhibit

The Devil and the Wilderness

Anglo-Americans in northern New England sometimes interpreted their own anxieties about the Wilderness, their faith, and their conflicts with Native Americans as signs that the Devil and his handmaidens, witches, were active in their midst.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - A Bay State Exodus

"… brought the skills of a midwife and caregiver that often meant the difference between life and death for her neighbors. Next step in our journey."

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Hallowell Ice Storm Poem

"… gripped the land with a hard hand as it softened neighbors’ hearts. Generously shared firewood and nourishment kept families warm and fed while…"

Site Page

Thomaston: The Town that Went to Sea - Prison leaves Thomaston - 2002

"A new larger facility was built in the neighboring town of Warren, and prisoners were moved there in February 2002."

My Maine Stories

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Story

A case of mistaken animal identity
by Judy Loeven

The time my neighbor's dog Tyson got away, or so I thought.

Story

From Brooklyn to Maine
by Samuel Gelber

Moving to Maine changed my artistic style, and I continue to learn from the landscape every day.

Story

Appreciation sign for essential health care workers
by Henry J Gartley

A neighbor expresses their appreciation for the workers at a local nursing home.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.