Search Results

Keywords: meeting house

Historical Items

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Item 22391

Tory Hill Meeting House, Buxton, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Dyer Library Archives / Saco Museum Date: circa 1900 Location: Buxton Media: Glass negative

Item 6711

First Meeting House, Lovell, ca. 1939

Contributed by: Lovell Historical Society Date: circa 1939 Location: Lovell Media: Photographic print

Item 18819

Union Free Meeting House, Bingham

Contributed by: Old Canada Road Historical Society Date: circa 1890 Location: Bingham Media: Photograph on heavy cardboard backing

Tax Records

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Item 67821

Assessor's Record, 81 Oak Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Friends Meeting House Use: Church

Item 65231

77 Newbury Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Raffaele Frascone Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 65229

73-75 Newbury Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: David Finkelman Use: Apartments

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Great Cranberry Island's Preble House

The Preble House, built in 1827 on a hilltop over Preble Cove on Great Cranberry Island, was the home to several generations of Hadlock, Preble, and Spurling family members -- and featured in several books.

Exhibit

Home: The Longfellow House & the Emergence of Portland

The Wadsworth-Longfellow house is the oldest building on the Portland peninsula, the first historic site in Maine, a National Historic Landmark, home to three generations of Wadsworth and Longfellow family members -- including the boyhood home of the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The history of the house and its inhabitants provide a unique view of the growth and changes of Portland -- as well as of the immediate surroundings of the home.

Exhibit

Port of Portland's Custom House and Collectors of Customs

The collector of Portland was the key to federal patronage in Maine, though other ports and towns had collectors. Through the 19th century, the revenue was the major source of Federal Government income. As in Colonial times, the person appointed to head the custom House in Casco Bay was almost always a leading community figure, or a well-connected political personage.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Meeting House Park

This green space became known as Meeting House Park. (And now you know that Church Street is named for John Church and not the North Church at the…

Site Page

Blue Hill, Maine - Meet Blue Hill's Project Team

Meet Blue Hill's Project Team Project Members at a Team Meeting X The Maine Community Heritage Project (MCHP), a partnership between the Maine…

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Millerite camp meeting, Orrington, 1844

John Martin (1823-1904) learned about the meeting and went to the campground to observe. He drew the picture in 1864 and included it on page 199 of…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Being an NP during social unrest
by Jacqueline P. Fournier

A snapshot of Mainers in a medical crisis of the time/Human experience in Maine.

Story

One View
by Karen Jelenfy

My life as an artist in Maine.

Story

Reverend Thomas Smith of First Parish Portland
by Kristina Minister, Ph.D.

Pastor, Physician, Real Estate Speculator, and Agent for Wabanaki Genocide

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Building Community/Community Buildings

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
Where do people gather? What defines a community? What buildings allow people to congregate to celebrate, learn, debate, vote, and take part in all manner of community activities? Students will evaluate images and primary documents from throughout Maine’s history, and look at some of Maine’s earliest gathering spaces and organizations, and how many communities established themselves around certain types of buildings. Students will make connections between the community buildings of the past and the ways we express identity and create communities today.