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Keywords: acting

Historical Items

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Item 9972

Acting Out Bible Stories, Camp Lanier

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1910 Location: Eliot Media: Photoprint

Item 153

Gov. William King, ca. 1890

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1890 Media: Photographic print

Item 9882

Camp drama at Lanier Camp, Eliot, ca. 1910

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1910 Location: Eliot Media: Photographic print

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Land Claims, Economic Opportunities?

The landmark 1980 Maine Indian Land Claims Settlement Act provided $81.6 million to Maine Indians for economic development, land purchase and other purposes. The money and increased land holdings, however, have not solved economic and employment issues for Maine Indians.

Exhibit

Clean Water: Muskie and the Environment

Maine Senator Edmund S. Muskie earned the nickname "Mr. Clean" for his environment efforts during his tenure in Congress from 1959 to 1980. He helped created a political coalition that passed important clean air and clean water legislation, drawing on his roots in Maine.

Exhibit

"Twenty Nationalities, But All Americans"

Concern about immigrants and their loyalty in the post World War I era led to programs to "Americanize" them -- an effort to help them learn English and otherwise adjust to life in the United States. Clara Soule ran one such program for the Portland Public Schools, hoping it would help the immigrants be accepted.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - Joseph Jovite Salvas

For nearly 40 years, Salvas produced, directed, and acted in plays targeting the Franco-American population all around Southern Maine.

Site Page

Scarborough: They Called It Owascoag - Scarborough Marsh: "Land of Much Grass" - Page 4 of 4

… of Much Grass" Sources Dunstan River X Acts and Resolves of the Legislature of Maine. ------“An Act to Establish a Corporation for the…

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Early Performing Arts Bar Harbor

This story would have served as a base in which a scene could be choreographed and acted out.

My Maine Stories

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Story

I never thought I would work at a paper mill.
by Greg Bizier

I love science and managed the lab for International Paper's Otis Mill for 31 years.

Story

My artwork help process memories of Vietnam
by Brian Barry

My Eagle drawing won first place in the Togus Arts and Crafts show, third in the Nationals.

Story

making light
by David Johansen

My relationship with Maine and how and why I make neon lights here.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Thermometrics

Grade Level: 3-8 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
Thermometrics is a term coined by Moody to describe his weather recording activities. Included here are some cross-curricula lesson plans and activities for students to use their knowledge in science, math and social studies while acting as weather forecasters. Check out the web-sites listed in this section for information on building your own barometer and anemometer.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries: The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?