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Keywords: Statehood

Historical Items

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Item 102192

John Chandler to William King on Maine statehood, Monmouth, 1818

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1818-10-03 Location: Monmouth Media: Ink on paper

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Item 102194

Joshua B. Lowell to John Chandler, Chesterville, 1819

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1819-01-25 Location: Chesterville Media: Ink on paper

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Item 103656

Letter from James Bridge to Reuel Williams discussing statehood, Boston, 1819

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1819-06-07 Location: Augusta; Boston Media: Ink on Paper

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Exhibits

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Exhibit

William King

Maine's first governor, William King, was arguably the most influential figure in Maine's achieving statehood in 1820. Although he served just one year as the Governor of Maine, he was instrumental in establishing the new state's constitution and setting up its governmental infrastructure.

Exhibit

Maine Politicians, National Leaders

From the early days of Maine statehood to the present, countless Maine politicians have made names for themselves on the national stage.

Exhibit

A Celebration of Skilled Artisans

The Maine Charitable Mechanic Association, an organization formed to promote and support skilled craftsmen, celebrated civic pride and members' trades with a parade through Portland on Oct. 8, 1841 at which they displayed 17 painted linen banners with graphic and textual representations of the artisans' skills.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - Overview: Road to Statehood

Overview: Road to Statehood Map of the Inhabited Part of Maine, Moses Greenleaf, 1829Item Contributed byMaine Historical Society Many know…

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - The Final Vote

… and the only thing standing its way from full statehood status was a vote in Washington to admit it into the Union.

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - The Missouri Compromise: A Moral Dilemma

Proclamation of statehood, 1820 Statehood at last! Written by William King—Maine's first governor—on March 16, 1820.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine's quest for statehood began in the years immediately following the American Revolution. Though the state of Massachusetts consented to the separation in 1819 and Maine would ultimately achieve statehood in 1820, Maine’s split from Massachusetts was not without controversy and was not universally supported by people living in Maine. Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: It is in the best interests of the people of Maine for Maine to become its own state.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Becoming Maine

Grade Level: 3-8 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students a foundational overview of the events leading up to Maine’s separation from Massachusetts in 1820. Through class participation exercises and a chance to look at historic maps and documents, students will begin to place where Maine's statehood fits into the broader narrative of 18th and 19th century American history. They will have the opportunity to cast their own Missouri Compromise vote after learning about Maine’s long road to statehood, and will make connections between the shape, citizens, and governance of Maine today and the shape, citizens, and governance of Maine in 1820.