Search Results

Keywords: Slavery

Historical Items

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Item 7346

Maine Anti-Slavery Society report, 1836

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1836-10-27 Location: Portland Media: Ink on paper

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Item 7485

Maine Anti-Slavery Society constitution, ca. 1833

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1833 Media: Ink on paper

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Item 10222

Minutes, Portland Anti-Slavery Society, 1844-1846, 1850-1851

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1844 Location: Portland Media: Ink on paper

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Exhibits

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Exhibit

Slavery's Defenders and Foes

Mainers, like residents of other states, had differing views about slavery and abolition in the early to mid decades of the 19th century. Religion and economic factors were among the considerations in determining people's leanings.

Exhibit

This Rebellion: Maine and the Civil War

For Mainers like many other people in both the North and the South, the Civil War, which lasted from 1861-1865, had a profound effect on their lives. Letters, artifacts, relics, and other items saved by participants at home and on the battlefield help illuminate the nature of the Civil War experience for Mainers.

Exhibit

Reuben Ruby: Hackman, Activist

Reuben Ruby of Portland operated a hack in the city, using his work to earn a living and to help carry out his activist interests, especially abolition and the Underground Railroad.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Anchor of the Soul - Anchor of the Soul

… Anchor of the Soul Anchor of the Soul A documentary about black history in Maine

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Part 3, pages 38-56

… and who explained to Martin and others what slavery was like, and especially, what it was like to be whipped.

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - The Missouri Compromise: A Moral Dilemma

… link Maine's approval with that of Missouri—a pro-slavery state—and agree upon a provision to keep the Union united by prohibiting slavery in the…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Maine and the Atlantic World Slave Economy
by Seth Goldstein

How Maine's historic industries are tied to slavery

Story

Reverend Thomas Smith of First Parish Portland
by Kristina Minister, Ph.D.

Pastor, Physician, Real Estate Speculator, and Agent for Wabanaki Genocide

Story

Cape Verde and the Doctrines of Discovery
by Lelia DeAndrade

My Cape Verde family's culture and history is tied to the Doctrines of Discovery

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Black History and the History of Slavery in Maine

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12, Postsecondary Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson presents an overview of the history of the Black community in Maine and the U.S., including Black people who were enslaved in Maine, Maine’s connections to slavery and the slave trade, a look into the racism and discrimination many Black people in Maine have experienced, and highlights selected histories of Black people, demonstrating the longevity of their experiences and contributions to the community and culture in Maine.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Becoming Maine: The Votes for Statehood

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine became a state in 1820 after separating from Massachusetts, but the call for statehood had begun long before the final vote. Why did it take so long? Was 1820 the right time? In this lesson, students will begin to place where Maine’s statehood fits into the broader narrative of 18th and 19th century American political history. They will have the opportunity to cast their own Missouri Compromise vote after learning about Maine’s long road to statehood.