Search Results

Keywords: Penobscot Lumber Boom

Historical Items

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Item 99444

Lumber boom on the Penobscot River at Bangor, ca. 1905

Contributed by: Bangor Public Library Date: circa 1905 Location: Bangor Media: Postcard

Item 99450

Penobscot River lumber raft at Bangor, ca. 1905

Contributed by: Bangor Public Library Date: circa 1905 Location: Bangor Media: Postcard

Item 33560

Log Jam at the Penobscot Boom, Bangor, ca. 1885

Contributed by: Bangor Public Library Date: circa 1885 Location: Bangor Media: Stereograph

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Washington County Through Eastern's Eye

Images taken by itinerant photographers for Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Company, a real photo postcard company, provide a unique look at industry, commerce, recreation, tourism, and the communities of Washington County in the early decades of the twentieth century.

Exhibit

Shepard Cary: Lumberman, Legislator, Leader and Legend

Shepard Cary (1805-1866) was one of the leading -- and wealthiest -- residents of early Aroostook County. He was a lumberman, merchant, mill operator, and legislator.

Exhibit

Holding up the Sky: Wabanaki people, culture, history, and art

Learn about Native diplomacy and obligation by exploring 13,000 years of Wabanaki residence in Maine through 17th century treaties, historic items, and contemporary artworks—from ash baskets to high fashion. Wabanaki voices contextualize present-day relevance and repercussions of 400 years of shared histories between Wabanakis and settlers to their region.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Bangor: Lumber Capital of the World

1905Item Contributed byBangor Public Library Lumber boom on the Penobscot River at Bangor, ca. 1905Item Contributed byBangor Public Library

Site Page

Ambajejus Boom House

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Lincoln, Maine - Steamboats

… not used as widely as they once were due to the boom in newer ships and better means by which to transport goods and people.