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Keywords: Electric Car

Historical Items

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Item 6018

Bangor Railway & Electric Co. No. 76

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1920 Location: Bangor Media: Photographic print

Item 59764

Kittery to York Beach electric railroad lines, ca. 1923

Contributed by: Seashore Trolley Museum Date: circa 1923 Location: York; Kittery Media: Ink on paper

Item 66022

"Warning," interior trolley car notice, ca. 1920

Contributed by: Seashore Trolley Museum Date: circa 1920 Location: Portland Media: ink on paper

Exhibits

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Exhibit

A Field Guide to Trolley Cars

Many different types of trolley cars -- for different weather, different uses, and different locations -- were in use in Maine between 1895-1940. The "field guide" explains what each type looked like and how it was used.

Exhibit

Wired! How Electricity Came to Maine

As early as 1633, entrepreneurs along the Piscataqua River in southern Maine utilized the force of the river to power a sawmill, recognizing the potential of the area's natural power sources, but it was not until the 1890s that technology made widespread electricity a reality -- and even then, consumers had to be urged to use it.

Exhibit

History in Motion: The Era of the Electric Railways

Street railways, whether horse-drawn or electric, required the building of trestles and tracks. The new form of transportation aided industry, workers, vacationers, and other travelers.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Seashore Trolley Museum

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - First electric railroad car in Bangor, 1889

First electric railroad car in Bangor, 1889 Contributed by Maine Historical Society and Maine State Museum Description The first electric

Site Page

Home: The Wadsworth-Longfellow House and Portland - The Wadsworth-Longfellow House, 1786-1960

… Chapman Building offered eleven floors of office space and a commercial arcade. Cars and electric trolleys filled Congress Street.