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Keywords: Early settler's

Historical Items

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Item 14582

Bark Spud, ca. 1650

Contributed by: Davistown Museum Date: circa 1650 Media: Forged iron

Item 4323

"Scituate," Brunswick, 1738

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1738 Location: Brunswick; Harpswell; Topsham Media: Ink on paper

Item 23336

Porterfield, 1793

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1793 Location: Porter; Brownfield Media: Ink on paper

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Settling along the Androscoggin and Kennebec

The Proprietors of the Township of Brunswick was a land company formed in 1714 and it set out to settle lands along the Androscoggin and Kennebec Rivers in Maine.

Exhibit

Colonial Cartography: The Plymouth Company Maps

The Plymouth Company (1749-1816) managed one of the very early land grants in Maine along the Kennebec River. The maps from the Plymouth Company's collection of records constitute some of the earliest cartographic works of colonial America.

Exhibit

Les Raquetteurs

In the early 1600s, French explorers and colonizers in the New World quickly adopted a Native American mode of transportation to get around during the harsh winter months: the snowshoe. Most Northern societies had some form of snowshoe, but the Native Americans turned it into a highly functional item. French settlers named snowshoes "raquettes" because they resembled the tennis racket then in use.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - More Permanent Settlers Arrive

More Permanent Settlers Arrive Two major waves of settlers arrived after 1768 – the first from Gloucester, Massachusetts in addition to James…

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - …then came the settlers…

…then came the settlers… Granite mountains, Mount Desert, 1837Item Contributed byMaine Historical Society While exploring Mount Desert as a…

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Early Settlers

Mr. Belcher’s early “fowling piece” is presently in the collection of Farmington Historical Society. We can only guess at its age.