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Keywords: Cooking

Historical Items

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Item 74768

Cooking school poster proof, 1964

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1964 Media: Ink on paper

Item 5644

Cooking class, Portland High School, ca. 1920

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1920 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Item 103632

Food baskets, Portland, ca. 1934

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media Date: circa 1934 Location: Portland Media: Glass Negative

Tax Records

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Item 85905

Cook property, E. side Island Avenue, Peaks Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Abbie G. Cook Use: Summer Dwelling

Item 85168

Cook property, S. Side Ocean Avenue, Peaks Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Abbie Geary Cook Use: Summer Dwelling

Item 89996

Cook property, West End Harrington Avenue, Long Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Clarence E. Cook Use: Summer Dwelling

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Cooks and Cookees: Lumber Camp Legends

Stories and tall tales abound concerning cooks and cookees -- important persons in any lumber camp, large or small.

Exhibit

How Sweet It Is

Desserts have always been a special treat. For centuries, Mainers have enjoyed something sweet as a nice conclusion to a meal or celebrate a special occasion. But many things have changed over the years: how cooks learn to make desserts, what foods and tools were available, what was important to people.

Exhibit

Wired! How Electricity Came to Maine

As early as 1633, entrepreneurs along the Piscataqua River in southern Maine utilized the force of the river to power a sawmill, recognizing the potential of the area's natural power sources, but it was not until the 1890s that technology made widespread electricity a reality -- and even then, consumers had to be urged to use it.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

Back (l-r): Lewis Brackley, Lawrence Cook, Glen Brackley, Laurence Voter, Wendell Cook, Ross Richards, Merlon Kingsley.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

Thaxter Cook, * Thaxter Cook Back row: * Col. James S Nash, * George T Jacobs, * Sylvester Vaughan, * Samuel Gilman, * Alden Gilman, Mrs.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Groups, Clubs & Organizations - Page 1 of 3

Back (l-r): Lewis Brackley, Lawrence Cook, Glen Brackley, Laurence Voter, Wendell Cook, Ross Richards, Merlon Kingsley.Item Contributed byStrong…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Ramen Making
by Ayumi Horie

Ramen Making is about family, cooking, pottery, and what it means to make a life through one's hands

Story

Portland cuisine supports health in West Africa
by Maria Cushing

I present Portuguese inspired food to fundraise for Amigos de Mente

Story

Finding and cooking fiddleheads with my parents
by Brian J. Theriault

My father has been picking and eating fiddleheads almost all his life, Mom prepares and stores them

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Becoming Maine

Grade Level: 3-8 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students a foundational overview of the events leading up to Maine’s separation from Massachusetts in 1820. Through class participation exercises and a chance to look at historic maps and documents, students will begin to place where Maine's statehood fits into the broader narrative of 18th and 19th century American history. They will have the opportunity to cast their own Missouri Compromise vote after learning about Maine’s long road to statehood, and will make connections between the shape, citizens, and governance of Maine today and the shape, citizens, and governance of Maine in 1820.