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Keywords: Birchbark canoes

Historical Items

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Item 80729

Wabanaki guides with canoes, Bar Harbor, 1881

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: 1881 Location: Bar Harbor Media: Stereograph

Item 80730

Canoeing at Bar Harbor, 1886

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: 1886 Location: Bar Harbor Media: Printed material

Item 23498

Model birchbark canoe, 1936

Contributed by: Hudson Museum, Univ. of Maine Date: 1936 Location: Princeton Media: Birchbark, spruce root

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Gifts From Gluskabe: Maine Indian Artforms

According to legend, the Great Spirit created Gluskabe, who shaped the world of the Native People of Maine, and taught them how to use and respect the land and the resources around them. This exhibit celebrates the gifts of Gluskabe with Maine Indian art works from the early nineteenth to mid twentieth centuries.

Exhibit

Making Paper, Making Maine

Paper has shaped Maine's economy, molded individual and community identities, and impacted the environment throughout Maine. When Hugh Chisholm opened the Otis Falls Pulp Company in Jay in 1888, the mill was one of the most modern paper-making facilities in the country, and was connected to national and global markets. For the next century, Maine was an international leader in the manufacture of pulp and paper.

Exhibit

Holding up the Sky: Wabanaki people, culture, history, and art

Learn about Native diplomacy and obligation by exploring 13,000 years of Wabanaki residence in Maine through 17th century treaties, historic items, and contemporary artworks—from ash baskets to high fashion. Wabanaki voices contextualize present-day relevance and repercussions of 400 years of shared histories between Wabanakis and settlers to their region.

Site Pages

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Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Canoe race, Kenduskeag Stream, Bangor, 1865

… in Bangor, ten Penobscot Indians in five birchbark canoes engaged in a race on the Kenduskeag Stream.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Guiding Services for Sport Hunters

Rusticators took great pleasure in seeing Wabanaki paddling skills displayed at the Club’s annual canoe races.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - The Indian Encampment

Visitors also stopped by the encampment to hire Indian guides for canoe outings or sport-hunting, to place special orders for items such as…

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.