In partnership with the Maine Memory Network Maine Memory Network

Maine Memory Network

Faces & Places of UMF

This slideshow contains 37 items
1
Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1880s

Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1880s

Item 64331 info
Mantor Library at UMF

The original building of the Farmington State Normal School was located on the corner of Main and Academy Streets. It was replaced with a new building in the late 1890s. Named in honor of the Merrill family for their services to the school, Merrill Hall has served as the school's main administration offices throughout its history.


2
Principal C.C. Rounds, Farmington State Normal School, 1868

Principal C.C. Rounds, Farmington State Normal School, 1868

Item 64267 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Charles C. Rounds was the third principal of the Western State Normal School, later known as Farmington State Normal School. He served from 1868-1883.

Rounds, along with State Superintendent Warren Johnson, devised and implemented the model school for teacher training the the Normal School.


3
Model classroom, Farmington State Normal School, 1870s

Model classroom, Farmington State Normal School, 1870s

Item 64268 info
Mantor Library at UMF

In the beginning, the Model School at Farmington State Normal School housed only three grades.

The purpose of the Model School was to serve as a training school for students of the Normal School and provided practical experience in a classroom prior to their entering the teaching profession.


4
Model School Classroom, Farmington State Normal School, 1917

Model School Classroom, Farmington State Normal School, 1917

Item 64269 info
Mantor Library at UMF

By the 1900s, the Model School within the Farmington State Normal School was growing along with its reputation. These are third and fourth grade students from a class in 1917.

In the 1920s, W. G. Mallett and other area educators championed combining the Model School with the town school. The new combined training school opened in 1932 and was renamed the W.G. Mallett School in 1942.


5
George C. Purington, Farmington State Normal School, 1907

George C. Purington, Farmington State Normal School, 1907

Item 64403 info
Mantor Library at UMF

George C. Purington served as the fourth principal of Farmington State Normal School from 1883-1909. He also taught psychology, didactics, civil government, agriculture, and music. He was very involved in the community and did much to improve the relationship between the school and the town of Farmington.

In Purington's view, the purpose of education was to produce physical, intellectual, and moral development. His didactics lectures identified the important mental qualities of an ideal teacher as "good natural ability, thorough and accurate knowledge, and a liberal education."

He proposed different methods of teaching, such as reading to the students, question and answer, and discussing the readings as ways to help students focus and learn better. Many of the ideals put forth by Purington on teachers education and teaching methods remain significant in teacher training today.


6
Purington family, Farmington, ca. 1890

Purington family, Farmington, ca. 1890

Item 64401 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Sarah Bailey Purington, her son George Colby Purington Jr., and the family dog Kaiser pose in a photographer's studio in the early 1890s.

They are the wife and son of George Purington, principal of Farmington State Normal School, who also was a member of the faculty.


7
George Purington, Grand Commander of Knights Templars of Maine, ca. 1890

George Purington, Grand Commander of Knights Templars of Maine, ca. 1890

Item 64399 info
Mantor Library at UMF

George Purington was very active in statewide organizations during his tenure as principal at Farmington State Normal School. He promoted the normal school idea through speeches and bulletins, resulting in increased enrollment at the school.

He was also president of the Christian Civic League and Grand Commander of the Knights Templars of Maine. Here he is in full Grand Commander regalia.


8
Merrill Hall, Farmington, 1896

Merrill Hall, Farmington, 1896

Item 64341 info
Mantor Library at UMF

In 1896, construction of the top floor of Merrill Hall was underway at the Normal School. Carpenters from A.T. Stewart posed with President George C. Purington in the back for this photo.

The Farmington Courthouse is in the background just behind Purington.


9
Teachers' Room, Farmington State Normal School, 1896

Teachers' Room, Farmington State Normal School, 1896

Item 64336 info
Mantor Library at UMF

In 1896, the main building at Farmington State Normal School, Merrill Hall, had a teachers room. This photo shows a group of teachers gathered there.

Principal George Purington hired some of the best graduates of the Normal School to be teachers at the Normal School or in the Model School. Among them, Lillian Lincoln, Hortense Merrill and Carolyn Stone.


10
Hortense Merrill, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1895

Hortense Merrill, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1895

Item 69693 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Hortense Merrill graduated from Farmington State Normal School in 1881 and received her degree from the school's Advanced Course in 1884. She then taught language at F.S.N.S. from 1885 to 1901 and English literature and history from 1903 to 1921.

Miss Merrill left the school in 1921 after 37 years of service and married Herbert J. Keith, who was also at F.S.N.S. graduate (Class of 1880).


11
Lillian Lincoln, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1895

Lillian Lincoln, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1895

Item 68219 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Lillian Lincoln graduated from F.S.N.S. in 1885. She remained at the school after completing her degree and taught geometry, drawing, and Latin. She earned her Advanced Course diploma from the school in 1890, and began working as the Principal of the Model School in 1894, where she remained until her retirement in 1924.

Miss Lincoln's additional contributions during her career included writing for the school magazine, The Farmington Normal, authoring two F.S.N.S songs, "O Mother Normal" and "Memories," and producing historical performances for the community.

She also authored two books on pedagogy. Teaching strategies she favored included encouraging students to ask questions, extending the learning experience beyond the classroom, and the use of projects or problem-based learning.


12
Lillian Lincoln, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1917

Lillian Lincoln, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1917

Item 65847 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Lillian Lincoln was an author, educator and director of the Model School at Farmington State Normal school, a position she held for 28 years. The Model School was created to provide practical classroom experience for student teachers at the Normal School.

Miss Lincoln also composed the F.S.N.S. school song, "O, Mother Normal." Lincoln Auditorium, on the campus of the University of Maine, Farmington, is named in her honor.


13
Carolyn Stone, Farmington State Normal School, 1898

Carolyn Stone, Farmington State Normal School, 1898

Item 68221 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Carolyn Stone graduated from Farmington State Normal School in 1898. She taught for one year at the Model School after graduation.


14
Carolyn Stone, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1907

Carolyn Stone, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1907

Item 68223 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Carolyn Stone became an instructor at Farmington State Normal School in 1901. She taught Physical Training, which included physiology and calisthenics, until 1903.

After leaving the Normal School to care for her ailing parents, she returned in 1905 and taught physical education and health education.


15
Women's basketball team, Farmington State Normal School, 1905

Women's basketball team, Farmington State Normal School, 1905

Item 68226 info
Mantor Library at UMF

In addition to her teaching physical training classes, Carolyn Stone was one of the early coaches of the Normal School's women's basketball team.

This is the 1905 team with Miss Stone seated in front. The students are Viola Priest, Harriet Wilder, Lillian Stoddard, Georgie Merriam, Edith Blinn, Hattie Doble, and Helen Piper.


16
Saturday shopping, Farmington, c. 1915

Saturday shopping, Farmington, c. 1915

Item 68022 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Farmington State Normal School teachers Inez Rolfe (left) and Carolyn Stone, photographed at 12 School St. with their arms full of parcels after a Saturday shopping trip.

Miss Rolfe was the Grade I teacher in the Model School from 1914 to 1916.

Miss Stone was teaching physiology, physical culture, arithmetic, and biology by 1915. A year later U.S. History was added to her teaching duties.


17
Carolyn Stone, Farmington State Normal School, 1928

Carolyn Stone, Farmington State Normal School, 1928

Item 68230 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Miss Stone became the Dean of Women at the Normal School in 1924. She continued to teach physical education classes while serving as dean. She also served as the school nurse until 1928.


18
Carolyn Stone, Farmington State Normal School, 1939

Carolyn Stone, Farmington State Normal School, 1939

Item 68231 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Miss Stone retired from Farmington State Normal School in 1939 after 39 years of service to the school.


19
Virginia Porter, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1907

Virginia Porter, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1907

Item 68908 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Virginia A. Porter was a teacher at Farmington State Normal School for 32 years, from 1907 to 1939. Over her long career, she taught childrens' literature, grammar, composition, penmanship, and geography.

Having no post-secondary education, she was hired to teach at F.S.N.S. based on her achievements as a teacher at Pembroke High School and Orono High School. She was well-loved by the students, and became the head of the English department in 1932.

Miss Porter was also active outside the classroom, leading geography field trips around town and to the local quarries. She founded the Modern Authors Club in 1927, which was a very popular student organization. She remained the club's adviser during her tenure at the school.

She was named Professor Emeritus of Farmington State Teachers College in 1957.


20
Geography class, North Jay granite quarry, 1914

Geography class, North Jay granite quarry, 1914

Item 63749 info
Mantor Library at UMF

On May 29, 1914, Miss Virginia Porter and the E geography class took a field trip to the Maine and New Hampshire Granite Corporation in North Jay. One of the students, Fred H. Moulton, acted as the group's guide.

The students saw how the stone was cut, transported, and finished as well as how the tools used in the process operated. It was voted an enjoyable and educational experience for all.

In this image of the group, student Blanche Fitzhenry is "eclipsed" by Miss Porter's bow.


21
W.G. Mallett, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1918

W.G. Mallett, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1918

Item 64410 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Principal Wilbert G. Mallett, who is standing on the steps of Merrill Hall, was affectionately nicknamed "Pa Mallett" by the Normal School students. He served as the F.S.N.S. principal from 1909 to 1940.

Mallett strongly believed in the value of a broad education, good morals and a healthy lifestyle. During his tenure at the Normal School, he carried on the tradition of assigning students mottoes to memorize, encouraged students to be active outdoors to stay healthy, and promoted the importance of civic responsibility and engagement.


22
Assembly Room, Farmington State Normal School, 1914

Assembly Room, Farmington State Normal School, 1914

Item 64346 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Students fill the Assembly Room, now known as Nordica Auditorium, in the Farmington Normal School's main building, Merrill Hall. W.G. Mallett, the principal, and Mr. Arthur Thomas, science teacher, are looking on from the back of the room.


23
Purington Hall, Farmington State Normal School, 1936

Purington Hall, Farmington State Normal School, 1936

Item 64397 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Purington Hall was built in 1914 to house the growing student population at the Farmington State Normal School. It opened in 1914 as the school's first dormitory and was named after the school's fourth principal, George C. Purington.

In 1922, it housed 117 female students and included a matron's suite, hospital suite, and living room. Its dining room accommodated 230, so students housed elsewhere could dine in the Hall.

The matron for many years was Mrs. L. Estelle Allen, affectionately known as "Ma Allen" to the students.

This image was taken in 1936.


24
Purington Hall lounge, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1937

Purington Hall lounge, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1937

Item 64396 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Purington Hall dormitory at Farmington State Normal School featured a lounge with fireplace where student residents could gather to socialize. Students could be found knitting, reading and chatting by its fireplace.


25
Mallett Hall, Farmington State Normal School, 1936

Mallett Hall, Farmington State Normal School, 1936

Item 64356 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Built in 1924 and originally called South Hall because it was constructed south of the existing Purington Hall, Mallett Hall was Farmington State Normal School's second dormitory.

By the 1920s, a new dormitory was needed to house the growing student population at the school. It was renamed Mallett Hall in 1940 in honor of Principal W.G. Mallett's years of service to the school.


26
Rooming assignment, Farmington State Normal School, 1924

Rooming assignment, Farmington State Normal School, 1924

Item 68440 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Because construction of the new dormitory building was behind schedule, temporary housing with local families was found for many Normal School students in fall 1924. The new dorm, originally named South Hall and later renamed Mallett Hall, finally opened in January of 1925.

Student Phyllis Smith received this rooming assignment notice from the college prior to the fall semester, informing her she would be staying at Mrs. Flood's. Handwritten on the notice are the words "double bed."


27
Mallett Hall Library, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1936

Mallett Hall Library, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1936

Item 64357 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Mallett Hall dormitory at Farmington State Normal School featured a library room. These students are reading magazines in the room.


28
Agnes Mantor, Farmington, ca. 1917

Agnes Mantor, Farmington, ca. 1917

Item 64264 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Agnes Mantor, a native of Skowhegan, graduated from Farmington State Normal School in 1915. Two years later, she returned to join the teaching staff. She was another former student hired by Principal Mallett and contributed a great deal to the school as teacher, librarian, and Dean.

Her career at the college, interrupted by occasional leaves for study, illness, and federal service, spanned 45 years.


29
Agnes Mantor, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1940

Agnes Mantor, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1940

Item 64266 info
Mantor Library at UMF

During her long career at Farmington State Normal School (later known as Farmington State Teachers College), Agnes Mantor was tasked with organizing the college's growing book collection and teaching library skills to students. In 1951, she became the official librarian.

She is shown here in the Edith Clifford Library, in Merrill Hall. In 1955, a new library was built and dedicated to Miss Mantor, "In view of her long service to the college."


30
Agnes Mantor, Farmington, ca. 1955

Agnes Mantor, Farmington, ca. 1955

Item 64265 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Agnes Mantor (1895-1971), a longtime teacher at Farmington State Teachers College, was a woman of many interests and accomplishments.

One of the college's few Democrats, Mantor was active on many political and business committees. In 1935, she left her teaching post on a two-year leave of absence to serve as the State Director of Women's Projects for the Maine division of the Works Progress Administration.

Upon her return to the school, she was appointed Dean of Women, and taught history. She authored books on Maine history and pioneered innovative Maine travel courses to introduce students to historical sites around the state.


31
Mary Palmer, Farmington State Normal School, 1930

Mary Palmer, Farmington State Normal School, 1930

Item 64270 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Mary Palmer was a teacher in the Home Economics department from 1924-1929 at the Farmington State Normal School. Her short tenure on campus had a lasting impact. A devoted gardener, Mary Palmer cultivated a flower garden behind the Home Economics Cottage.

A year after Mary's untimely death in 1934, the garden was named for her. The garden as it exists today, between Preble and Ricker Halls, retains the original sign and sundial. In this photo dated 1930, Mary is seated in the garden.


32
Palmer Hall, Farmington State Normal School, 1930

Palmer Hall, Farmington State Normal School, 1930

Item 64276 info
Mantor Library at UMF

This house on South Street was named Palmer Hall in 1929, in honor of Mary Palmer, a much-loved Home Economics teacher.

Prior to being used as a dormitory for students in the Home Economics program, the building served as Dr. Ross's hospital. It was later torn down to make room for Mantor Library.


33
Spring Tea in the Mary Palmer Garden, Farmington State Normal School, 1930

Spring Tea in the Mary Palmer Garden, Farmington State Normal School, 1930

Item 64272 info
Mantor Library at UMF

The Mary Palmer Garden, located behind the Home Economics Cottage at the Farmington State Normal School, served as the setting of many Home Economics Department social functions, including teas, luncheons, and Home Economics graduation ceremonies.

The garden was planned by the Home Ec Club in 1927 and the Club and the Home Ec alumni contributed to its construction and the addition of the original entrance arbor (replaced in 2012), sign and a bird bath.


34
Normal School students in Mary Palmer Garden, 1948

Normal School students in Mary Palmer Garden, 1948

Item 64273 info
Mantor Library at UMF

These three young women reading in the Mary Palmer Garden may have been student residents of the Home Economics Cottage.

The garden, originally planned and tended by Home Economics teacher Mary Palmer in the back yard of the Cottage, was later restored in its current location between Ricker and Preble Halls. The original entrance arbor, seen in this photo, was replaced in 2012. The original sign has been placed in the new arbor.


35
Errol Dearborn, Farmington State Normal School, 1918

Errol Dearborn, Farmington State Normal School, 1918

Item 64409 info
Mantor Library at UMF

In 1918, World War I had emptied the Normal School of male students. This picture of Errol Dearborn comes from a classmate's photo album. Her caption reads: "Mr. Dearborn - our only boy but he was good enough so we didn't need any others. He was our class president. The girls all liked him but Nan faired better than the rest."

Dearborn became a teacher at the Normal School in 1922. An avid supporter of all collegiate athletics, he coached many of the school's teams - at times even playing on the baseball team to make enough players.

He launched and led the drive to build a gymnasium, which resulted in the construction of Alumni Gymnasium in 1931. In 1965, the Farmington State Teachers College named its new athletic facility Dearborn Gymnasium in his honor.


36
Alumni Gymnasium, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1946

Alumni Gymnasium, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1946

Item 69870 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Alumni Gymnasium was opened at Farmington State Normal School in 1931.

Prior to the new building's existence, the school used the basement of Merrill Hall for exercise classes, and the school's basketball team had to rent a hall for home games and played in various places. This new school gym allowed not only athletic events, but dances and other entertainments to be held on campus.


37
Errol L. Dearborn, Farmington Normal School, ca. 1935

Errol L. Dearborn, Farmington Normal School, ca. 1935

Item 64355 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Errol L. Dearborn became a member of the teaching staff in 1922 and remained at the college until 1953. He taught civics, educational measurements, and math and also served as coach for some the early athletics teams.

His last eight years at the school, then known as Farmington State Teachers College, were as president.


This slideshow contains 37 items