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Indians at the Centennial

This Exhibit Contains 13 Items
1
Indian Village at Deering Oaks Park, Portland, 1920

Indian Village at Deering Oaks Park, Portland, 1920

Item 5381 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

The Passamaquoddy Indian Village at Deering Oaks Park was a popular attraction at the Maine Centennial Exposition June 26-July 5, 1920.

Most events were held at the Exposition Building and were intended to showcase Maine-made goods, foster unity among businessmen, strengthen the state's industrial and agricultural interests, and develop the state's resources.


2
William Neptune, Portland, 1920

William Neptune, Portland, 1920

Item 12290 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Passamaquoddy Governor William Neptune, 45, and his family were on hand at the Indian Village at Deering Oaks.

The official Centennial program pointed out that Deering Oaks was "the scene of one of Portland's greatest Indian battles, a tablet erected there commemorating the event."

It also noted that "Bullets that were fired from the guns of the early pioneers in these engagements with the Indians are still found in the trunks of some of the old trees."


3
Clara Neptune, Portland, 1920

Clara Neptune, Portland, 1920

Item 5270 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Clara Neptune was among those who dressed in traditional finery and camped at Deering Oaks Park during the week-long centennial celebration that included musical concerts, sports programs, a large parade, and exhibits of warships, airplanes, submarines and U.S. Cavalry troops.


4
Maine Indians, Maine Centennial, Portland, 1920

Maine Indians, Maine Centennial, Portland, 1920

Item 5275 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Most Passamaquoddies, from Washington County, worked as basket-makers or laborers at the time of the Centennial.

The local newspaper, The Eastern Argus, wrote "Indians made many sacrifices to come here."

Also encamped at Deering Oaks Park were Boy Scouts, many of whose programs were based on Indian traditions.


5
Maine Indians, Portland, 1920

Maine Indians, Portland, 1920

Item 5274 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

While in Portland, Indians demonstrated their basket-making skills and other crafts and sold items they made to the crowds of onlookers.

Each day of the Centennial had a theme -- History, Music Festival, Exposition, State of Maine, Women, Mardi Gras, Veteran Firemen, Church Service and Independence.


6
Dignitaries at the Maine Centennial celebrations, Portland, 1920

Dignitaries at the Maine Centennial celebrations, Portland, 1920

Item 5269 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Passamaquoddy Governor William Neptune told the local newspaper that Indians were losing fishing and basket-making time by attending the event in Portland.


7
Sarah Mitchell and Mary Newell, Portland, 1920

Sarah Mitchell and Mary Newell, Portland, 1920

Item 5281 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Sarah Mitchell was the wife of the last surviving veteran (tribal) from the American Civil War, Peter Mitchell. She is with her granddaughter, Mary Newell.


8
Passamaquoddies at the Maine Centennial, Portland, 1920

Passamaquoddies at the Maine Centennial, Portland, 1920

Item 5268 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Susan Neptune, left, her mother, at right, and an unidentified woman. Throughout the 10-day centennial, the Passamaquoddy Indians displayed their cultural traditions to the crowds.


9
Governor Carl E. Milliken, Horace Nicholas, Portland, 1920

Governor Carl E. Milliken, Horace Nicholas, Portland, 1920

Item 5295 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Passamaquoddy Governor William Neptune paddles Maine Governor Carl E. Milliken across the Duck Pond at Deering Oaks Park on July 2, 1920.

The Indians gave Milliken a ceremonial bow and arrow and performed a tribal dance.


10
Benjamin and Mary Neptune, Portland, 1920

Benjamin and Mary Neptune, Portland, 1920

Item 5380 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Benjamin and Marie Neptune were among the children at the encampment.

Benjamin's father was Passamaquoddy Governor William Neptune.


11
Sabattus Lola and Sabattus Mitchell, Portland, 1920

Sabattus Lola and Sabattus Mitchell, Portland, 1920

Item 5282 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Sabattus Lola, left, 55, was a basket dealer and Sabattus Mitchell, right, 36, was a basketmaker.


12
Passamaquoddy Indian, Portland, 1920

Passamaquoddy Indian, Portland, 1920

Item 5294 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

A member of the Passamaquoddy tribe smokes a pipe during the encampment that was part of the Maine Centennial celebration.


13
Maine Indian man, Portland, 1920

Maine Indian man, Portland, 1920

Item 5293 info
Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Governor Neptune told the local newspaper that 65 years earlier, Indians hunted and fished and did not have to make baskets to sell to make a living. "White people have stripped us from top to bottom."


This Exhibit Contains 13 Items
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