Maine Memory Network
Maine's Online Museum

Login · My Account · Show Album


 

 

Search Results

Keywords: Moosehead Lake

  Advanced Search
       
             

List View  |  Thumbnails View

Exhibits

Your results include these online exhibits. You also can view all of the site's exhibits, view a timeline of selected events in Maine History, and learn how to create your own exhibit.

Page: 1 |


 

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
Steamboats

Moosehead Steamboats

After the canoe, steamboats became the favored method of transportation on Moosehead Lake. They revolutionized movement of logs and helped promote tourism in the region.

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
John W. G. Dunn, Moosehead Lake, 1904

John Dunn, 19th Century Sportsman

John Warner Grigg Dunn was an accomplished amateur photographer, hunter, fisherman and lover of nature. On his trips to Ragged Lake and environs, he became an early innovator among amateur wildlife photographers. His photography left us with a unique record of the Moosehead Lake region in the late nineteenth century.

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
Noon Lunch, Eagle Lake, 1911

Umbazooksus & Beyond

Visitors to the Maine woods in the early twentieth century often recorded their adventures in private diaries or journals and in photographs. Their remembrances of canoeing, camping, hunting and fishing helped equate Maine with wilderness.

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
Walker Memorial Library, Westbrook, 1943

Hunting Season

Maine's ample woods historically provided numerous game animals and birds for hunters seeking food, fur, or hides. The promotion of hunting as tourism and concerns about conservation toward the end of the nineteenth century changed the nature of hunting in Maine.

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
Potato pickers, Caribou, ca. 1930

Laboring in Maine

Workers in Maine have labored in factories, on farms, in the woods, on the water, among other locales. Many of Maine's occupations have been determined by the state's climate and geographical features.

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
Rockefeller Drive, Mt. Desert Island, ca. 1935

Designing Acadia

For one hundred years, Acadia National Park has captured the American imagination and stood as the most recognizable symbol of Maine’s important natural history and identity. This exhibit highlights Maine Memory content relating to Acadia and Mount Desert Island.

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
Samoset Hotel, Rockland, ca. 1930

Luxurious Leisure

From the last decades of the nineteenth century through about the 1920s, vacationers were attracted to large resort hotels that promised a break from the noise, crowds, and pressures of an ever-urbanizing country.

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
Pulp pile, St. Croix Paper Co., Woodland, ca. 1910

Making Paper, Making Maine

Paper has shaped Maine's economy, molded individual and community identities, and impacted the environment throughout Maine. When Hugh Chisholm opened the Otis Falls Pulp Company in Jay in 1888, the mill was one of the most modern paper-making facilities in the country, and was connected to national and global markets. For the next century, Maine was an international leader in the manufacture of pulp and paper. 

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
Page Terrace, Fairfield, ca. 1930

Good Will-Hinckley: Building a Landscape

The landscape at the Good Will-Hinckley campus in Fairfield was designed to help educate and influence the orphans and other needy children at the school and home.

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Pinterest
Poland Spring House, 1889

Poland Spring: Summering in Fashion

During the Gilded Age at the end of the nineteenth century, Americans sought to leave increasing urban, industrialized lives for the health and relaxation of the country. The Poland Spring resort, which offered a beautiful setting, healing waters, and many amenities, was one popular destination.

Page: 1 |