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Keywords: pulpwood

Historical Items

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Item 17360

Loading Pulpwood, Portage, ca. 1970

Contributed by: Oakfield Historical Society Date: circa 1970 Location: Portage Media: Photographic print

Item 101042

Sleds of pulpwood, Magalloway Township, 1939

Contributed by: National Archives at Boston Date: 1939 Location: Magalloway Township Media: Photographic print

Item 100975

Tractor hauling pulpwood, Magalloway Township, 1939

Contributed by: National Archives at Boston Date: 1939 Location: Magalloway Township Media: Photographic print

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Princeton: Woods and Water Built This Town

Princeton benefited from its location on a river -- the St. Croix -- that was useful for transportation of people and lumber and for powering mills as well as on its proximity to forests.

Exhibit

Prisoners of War

Mainers have been held prisoners in conflicts fought on Maine and American soil and in those fought overseas. In addition, enemy prisoners from several wars have been brought to Maine soil for the duration of the war.

Exhibit

Making Paper, Making Maine

Paper has shaped Maine's economy, molded individual and community identities, and impacted the environment throughout Maine. When Hugh Chisholm opened the Otis Falls Pulp Company in Jay in 1888, the mill was one of the most modern paper-making facilities in the country, and was connected to national and global markets. For the next century, Maine was an international leader in the manufacture of pulp and paper. 

Site Pages

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Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

Smith. He produced not only lumber but also wood-turnings. Pulpwood for turnings was amassed on the bank across the road.

Site Page

Patten Lumbermen's Museum

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - Skowhegan: "A Place To Watch"

… being replaced by the easier to manage four-foot pulpwood logs, which were floated downstream all summer long.