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Historical Items (3)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (3)  |  Site Pages (0)  |  My Maine Stories (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 3 View All

Item 74853

Electrical first-aid booklet, 1915

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1915

Media: Ink on paper

Item 74441

CMP First Aid Team, Rockland, 1929

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Location: Rockland

Media: Photographic print

Item 74854

Electric shock first-aid poster, ca. 1910

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: circa 1910

Media: Ink on paper

Exhibits Showing 3 of 3 View All

Exhibit

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Reddy Kilowatt lapel pin, ca. 1955

Wired! How Electricity Came to Maine

As early as 1633, entrepreneurs along the Piscataqua River in southern Maine utilized the force of the river to power a sawmill, recognizing the potential of the area's natural power sources, but it was not until the 1890s that technology made widespread electricity a reality -- and even then, consumers had to be urged to use it.

Exhibit

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Khadija Guled, Portland, 2009

400 years of New Mainers

Immigration is one of the most debated topics of debate in Maine. Controversy aside, immigration is also America's oldest tradition, and along with religious tolerance, what our nation was built upon. Since the first people—the Wabanaki—permitted Europeans to settle in the land now known as Maine, we have been a state of immigrants.

Exhibit

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Wadsworth-Longfellow House, Congress Street, Portland, ca. 1890

Home: The Longfellow House & the Emergence of Portland

The Wadsworth-Longfellow house is the oldest building on the Portland peninsula, the first historic site in Maine, a National Historic Landmark, home to three generations of Wadsworth and Longfellow family members -- including the boyhood home of the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The history of the house and its inhabitants provide a unique view of the growth and changes of Portland -- as well as of the immediate surroundings of the home.