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Keywords: I. O. O. F.


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Historical Items (27)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (17)  |  Sites (17)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 27 View All

Item 26788

Title: Aroostook Valley Car, Washburn, ca. 1910

Contributed by: Seashore Trolley Museum

Date: circa 1910

Location: Washburn

Media: Postcard

Item 35479

Title: I.O.O.F. Badge, Lubec, 1893-1933

Contributed by: Lubec Historical Society

Location: Lubec

Media: Lithographed metal and fabric badge

Item 78663

Title: Odd Fellows Hall, Westbrook, 1883

Contributed by: Walker Memorial Library

Date: 1883

Location: Westbrook

Media: Photograph

Exhibits Showing 3 of 17 View All

Exhibit

Brig. Gen. George F. Shepley, ca. 1863

George F. Shepley: Lawyer, Soldier, Administrator

George F. Shepley of Portland had achieved renown as a lawyer and as U.S. Attorney for Maine when, at age 42 he formed the 12th Maine Infantry and went off to war. Shepley became military governor of Louisiana early in 1862 and remained in the military for the duration of the war.

Exhibit

Skowhegan Doughboys in France, 1918, WW I

Great War and Armistice Day

In 1954, November 11 became known as Veterans Day, a time to honor American veterans of all wars. The holiday originated, however, as a way to memorialize the end of World War I, November 11, 1918, and to "perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations." Mainers were involved in World War I as soldiers, nurses, and workers on the homefront aiding the military effort.

Exhibit

Ku Klux Klan Constitution cover, 1921

The Nativist Klan

In Maine, like many other states, a newly formed Ku Klux Klan organization began recruiting members in the years just before the United States entered World War I. A message of patriotism and cautions about immigrants and non-Protestants drew many thousands of members into the secret organization in the early 1920s. By the end of the decade, the group was largely gone from Maine.

Sites Showing 3 of 17 View All

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.

Site

Sorting gap, North Lincoln, 1910

Lincoln, Maine

The history of a long-time mill town as depicted by seventh and eighth grade students at Mattanawcook Junior High School, with help from Lincoln Historical Society and Lincoln Memorial Library. The site includes exhibits on the paper industry, founding fathers, wartime Lincoln, Main Street, influential institutions, and communication and transportation.

Site

Bangor from the east bank of the Penobscot River, ca. 1905

Life on a Tidal River

An introduction to Bangor history as depicted by a broad-based group of city institutions and organizations. Partners included the middle-level William S. Cohen and James F. Doughty Schools, Bangor High School, Bangor Public Library, Bangor Museum and Center for History, and individual city historians. Topics covered include early railroads, natural disasters, the Brady Gang, the Civil War, and the 1940s.