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Keywords: Club Jacque Cartier

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Historical Items (11)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (3)  |  Site Pages (0)  |  My Maine Stories (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 11 View All

Item 18420

Banner du Institut Jacques Cartier

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection

Date: circa 1900

Location: Lewiston

Media: Silk

Item 18419

Jacques Cartier banner, Lewisston, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection

Date: circa 1900

Location: Lewiston

Media: Silk

Item 18392

St-Jean-Baptiste Day parade, Auburn, 1962

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection

Date: 1962

Location: Auburn

Media: Photographic print

Exhibits Showing 3 of 3 View All

Exhibit

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Jacques Cartier snowshoe club, ca. 1925

Les Raquetteurs

In the early 1600s, French explorers and colonizers in the New World quickly adopted a Native American mode of transportation to get around during the harsh winter months: the snowshoe. Most Northern societies had some form of snowshoe, but the Native Americans turned it into a highly functional item. French settlers named snowshoes "raquettes" because they resembled the tennis racket then in use.

Exhibit

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Jean-Baptiste Couture, Lewiston, 1926

Le Théâtre

Lewiston, Maine's second largest city, was long looked upon by many as a mill town with grimy smoke stacks, crowded tenements, low-paying jobs, sleazy clubs and little by way of refinement, except for Bates College. Yet, a noted Québec historian, Robert Rumilly, described it as "the French Athens of New England."

Exhibit

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St-Jean-Baptiste portrayal, 1890

La St-Jean in Lewiston-Auburn

St-Jean-Baptiste Day -- June 24th -- in Lewiston-Auburn was a very public display of ethnic pride for nearly a century. Since about 1830, French Canadians had used St. John the Baptist's birthdate as a demonstration of French-Canadian nationalism.