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Keywords: Clean water act


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Historical Items (2)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (5)  |  Sites (14)  | 

Historical Items Showing 2 of 2 View All

Item 25835

Title: Edmund S. Muskie letter to the editor, 1971

Contributed by: Edmund S. Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library

Date: 1971-12-09

Location: Waterville

Media: Ink on paper

Item 25724

Title: Letter to Muskie on environmental work, 1971

Contributed by: Edmund S. Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library

Date: 1971-05-25

Media: Ink on paper

Exhibits Showing 3 of 5 View All

Exhibit

Edmund S. Muskie, Democratic nominee for U.S. vice president, 1968

Clean Water: Muskie and the Environment

Maine Senator Edmund S. Muskie earned the nickname "Mr. Clean" for his environment efforts during his tenure in Congress from 1959 to 1980. He helped created a political coalition that passed important clean air and clean water legislation, drawing on his roots in Maine.

Exhibit

Wadsworth-Longfellow House, Congress Street, Portland, ca. 1890

Home: The Longfellow House & the Emergence of Portland

The Wadsworth-Longfellow house is the oldest building on the Portland peninsula, the first historic site in Maine, a National Historic Landmark, home to three generations of Wadsworth and Longfellow family members -- including the boyhood home of the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The history of the house and its inhabitants provide a unique view of the growth and changes of Portland -- as well as of the immediate surroundings of the home.

Exhibit

Northport Hotel, ca. 1900

Summer Folk: The Postcard View

Vacationers, "rusticators," or tourists began flooding into Maine in the last quarter of the 19th century. Many arrived by train or steamer. Eventually, automobiles expanded and changed the tourist trade, and some vacationers bought their own "cottages."

Sites Showing 3 of 14 View All

Site

Ox Cart at N.W. Marston's Store, South Lubec, ca. 1880

Lubec, Maine

A history of the easternmost town in Maine as created by the Lubec Historical Society, Lubec Consolidated School, Lubec Landmarks, and Lubec Memorial Library. Exhibits include the sardine and herring industries, the Sardine Queen, the West Quoddy Head Lighthouse, the 1911 Centennial Celebration, the S. S. Cumberland Steamer, the gold hoax, an important community quilt, a tragic boating accident, and the blizzard of 1934, among others.

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.

Site

Maternity, Hallowell Granite Works, ca. 1895

Historic Hallowell

The history of the smallest city in Maine as created by a team consisting of the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, Hubbard Free Library, The Row House, Vaughan Homestead Foundation, Hallowell Firemen’s Association, and students from Hall-Dale Middle School. Topics covered include: natural disasters, the granite industry and other industries central to the development of the city, firefighters and police, Hallowell’s contribution to modern medicine, the Kennebec River, and more.