Making Paper- Strikes


Strike at St. Regis Paper, Bucksport, 1979

Strike at St. Regis Paper, Bucksport, 1979
Item 5626   info
Maine Historical Society

More than 900 employees went on strike early on May 15, 1979 at the St. Regis Paper Co. in Bucksport. This was the first work stoppage in the history of the mill.

United Paperworkers International strike, Rumford, 1980

United Paperworkers International strike, Rumford, 1980
Item 5862   info
Maine Historical Society

July 29, 1980 at Rumford's Boise Cascade paper mill found union workers on strike.

Nine pickets were arrested as they attempted to block pulp and chip trucks delivering loads to the mill.

Papermakers on strike, Rumford, 1980

Papermakers on strike, Rumford, 1980
Item 10964   info
Maine Historical Society

Some 1,200 members of the United Paperworkers International Union struck the Boise-Cascade mill in July 1980. The company and the workers disagreed about the proposed wage and benefit package.

The man on the right is Joseph E. Thibeault Jr., a longtime employee of the company. The man on the left, holding the sign, is Henry "Frenchie" Pellerin.

Boise Cascade strikers, Rumford, 1980

Boise Cascade strikers, Rumford, 1980
Item 64400   info
Maine Historical Society

Members of the United Paperworkers International who were on strike at the Boise Cascade paper mill in Rumford move out of the way of a large truck trying to deliver a load of pulp to the mill on July 30, 1980.

About 1,200 members of the union went on strike after rejected a contract offer. Nine strikers who tried to block delivery of pulp trucks had been arrested two days before this photo was taken.

The strike lasted about a month.

Welcome to Jay sign, ca. 1986

Welcome to Jay sign, ca. 1986
Item 75127   info
Maine's Paper & Heritage Museum

In 1986 Reginald Howes' "Welcome to Jay" sign was destroyed during the International Paper Company strike. It is believed that the sign was created in 1986 and was the first sign welcoming people to the town of Jay.

Friends and family had warned Howes that it may not be a good idea to make the sign because of the approaching strike, but he ignored their warnings. Shortly after the sign was erected it was destroyed by employees in the 1986/1987 strike.

Howes attended the Boston School of Art shortly after WWII and had created a variety of signs including signs for local businesses.

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