Search Results

Keywords: historical

Historical Items

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Item 31422

Scarborough Historical Society and Museum Building, ca. 1964

Contributed by: Scarborough Historical Society & Museum Date: circa 1964 Location: Scarborough Media: Photographic print

Item 79369

Lewiston Historical Commission, 1969

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection Date: 1969 Location: Lewiston Media: Photographic print

Item 14444

Bar Harbor Historical Society

Contributed by: Bar Harbor Historical Society Date: circa 1997 Location: Bar Harbor Media: Wood

Tax Records

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Item 38578

Assessor's Record, 485 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Maine Historical Society Use: Office

Item 38579

Assessor's Record, 485 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Maine Historical Society Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 53396

159-161 Fore Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Dwelling - Historic and International Longfellow Society

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 111350

Georgetown Historical Society elevations, Georgetown, 2003-2006

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 2003–2006 Location: Georgetown Client: Georgetown Historical Society Architect: Carol A. Wilson; UJMN and Carol A. Wilson Architects

Item 111467

Maine Historical Society presentation drawing, Portland, ca. 2015

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 2015 Location: Portland Client: Maine Historical Society Architect: Carol A. Wilson; Carol A. Wilson, Architect

Item 111357

Chebeague Island Historical Society presentation drawing, Chebeague Island, 2001

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 2001 Location: Chebeague Island Client: Chebeague Island Historical Society Architect: Carol A. Wilson; UJMN and Carol A. Wilson Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

MHS in Pictures: exploring our first 200 years

Two years after separating from Massachusetts, Maine leaders—many who were part of the push for statehood—also separated from Massachusetts Historical Society, creating the Maine Historical Society in 1822. The legislation signed on February 5, 1822 positioned MHS as the third-oldest state dedicated historical organization in the nation. The exhibition features MHS's five locations over the institution's two centuries, alongside images of leaders who have steered the organization through pivotal times.

Exhibit

Northern Threads: Two centuries of dress at Maine Historical

Organized by themed vignettes, Northern Threads shares stories about Maine people, while exploring how the clothing they wore reveals social, economic, and environmental histories. This re-examination of Maine Historical Society's permanent collection is an opportunity to consider the relevance of historic clothing in museums, the ebb and flow of fashion styles, and the complexities of diverse representation spanning 200 years of collecting.

Exhibit

Holding up the Sky: Wabanaki people, culture, history, and art

Learn about Native diplomacy and obligation by exploring 13,000 years of Wabanaki residence in Maine through 17th century treaties, historic items, and contemporary artworks—from ash baskets to high fashion. Wabanaki voices contextualize present-day relevance and repercussions of 400 years of shared histories between Wabanakis and settlers to their region.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Cornish Historical Society

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Bridgewater Historical Society

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Durham Historical Society

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Share your COVID-19 story for future generations
by Steve Bromage and Jamie Rice, Maine Historical Society

Learn how you can share your stories on Maine Memory Network

Story

Colin Sutch
by MLTI Stories of Impact Project

Colin Sutch was an Education student at the University of Maine as MLTI began.

Story

Laura Richter - Educator
by MLTI Stories of Impact Project

Laura Richter was a Middle School Educator in Skowhegan, Maine as the MLTI began in 2002.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Building Community/Community Buildings

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
Where do people gather? What defines a community? What buildings allow people to congregate to celebrate, learn, debate, vote, and take part in all manner of community activities? Students will evaluate images and primary documents from throughout Maine’s history, and look at some of Maine’s earliest gathering spaces and organizations, and how many communities established themselves around certain types of buildings. Students will make connections between the community buildings of the past and the ways we express identity and create communities today.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine's quest for statehood began in the years immediately following the American Revolution. Though the state of Massachusetts consented to the separation in 1819 and Maine would ultimately achieve statehood in 1820, Maine’s split from Massachusetts was not without controversy and was not universally supported by people living in Maine. Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: It is in the best interests of the people of Maine for Maine to become its own state.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.