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Category: Social Movements & Services, Clubs & societies, Religious

Historical Items

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Item 15501

YMCA, Portland, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Portland; Portland Media: Glass Negative

Item 76508

Home of Mrs. Lillian M.W. Stevens, Portland, ca. 1910

Contributed by: Greater Portland Landmarks Date: circa 1910 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Item 6862

Ligue des Societes Catholiques de Langue Francais invitation, 1936

Contributed by: Franco Center Date: 1936-03-29 Location: Lewiston Media: Postcard

Exhibits

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Exhibit

400 years of New Mainers

Immigration is one of the most debated topics in Maine. Controversy aside, immigration is also America's oldest tradition, and along with religious tolerance, what our nation was built upon. Since the first people--the Wabanaki--permitted Europeans to settle in the land now known as Maine, we have been a state of immigrants.

Exhibit

Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In

Adorning oneself to look one's "best" has varied over time, gender, economic class, and by event. Adornments suggest one's sense of identity and one's intent to stand out or fit in.

Exhibit

From French Canadians to Franco-Americans

French Canadians who emigrated to the Lewiston-Auburn area faced discrimination as children and adults -- such as living in "Little Canada" tenements and being ridiculed for speaking French -- but also adapted to their new lives and sustained many cultural traditions.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Building Community/Community Buildings

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
Where do people gather? What defines a community? What buildings allow people to congregate to celebrate, learn, debate, vote, and take part in all manner of community activities? Students will evaluate images and primary documents from throughout Maine’s history, and look at some of Maine’s earliest gathering spaces and organizations, and how many communities established themselves around certain types of buildings. Students will make connections between the community buildings of the past and the ways we express identity and create communities today.