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Category: Science & Technology, Research

Historical Items

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Item 6130

Processing Maine ore, New Jersey, ca. 1954

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1954 Media: Photographic print

Item 6131

Chemist extracting manganese, New Jersey, 1954

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1954 Media: Photographic print

Item 9725

Charles A. Stephens Laboratory postcard, ca. 1921

Contributed by: Norway Historical Society Date: circa 1921 Location: Norway Media: Postcard

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Wiscasset's Arctic Connection

Scientist, author and explorer Donald B. MacMillan established Wiscasset as his homeport for many of the voyages he made to the Arctic region starting in the early 1920s.

Exhibit

Bowdoin College Scientific Expedition to Labrador

"The Bowdoin Boys" -- some students and recent graduates -- traveled to Labrador in 1891 to collect artifacts, specimens, and to try to find Grand Falls, a waterfall deep in Labrador's interior.

My Maine Stories

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Story

I never thought I would work at a paper mill.
by Greg Bizier

I love science and managed the lab for International Paper's Otis Mill for 31 years.

Story

Mosher family history and my career at S.D. Warren
by Abbott Mosher

My family settled the Westbrook region and I am a 4th generation paper maker at S.D. Warren.

Story

Scientist Turned Artist Making Art Out of Trash
by Ian Trask

Bowdoin College alum returns to midcoast Maine to make environmentally conscious artwork

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.