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Category: Government, Politics & Law, Legal Documents

Historical Items

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Item 17125

Mary Champernowne power of attorney, Kittery, 1700

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1700 Location: Kittery Media: Ink on paper

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Item 17381

William Whipple, Kittery

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1775 Media: Ink on paper

Item 23811

Josiah Pierce probate account, Baldwin, ca. 1830

Contributed by: Pierce Family Collection through Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1830 Location: Baldwin Media: Ink on paper

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Exhibits

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Exhibit

Unlocking the Declaration's Secrets

Fewer than 30 copies of the first printing of the Declaration of Independence are known to exist. John Dunlap hurriedly printed copies for distribution to assemblies, conventions, committees and military officers. Authenticating authenticity of the document requires examination of numerous details of the broadside.

Exhibit

Land Claims, Economic Opportunities?

The landmark 1980 Maine Indian Land Claims Settlement Act provided $81.6 million to Maine Indians for economic development, land purchase and other purposes. The money and increased land holdings, however, have not solved economic and employment issues for Maine Indians.

Exhibit

Clean Water: Muskie and the Environment

Maine Senator Edmund S. Muskie earned the nickname "Mr. Clean" for his environment efforts during his tenure in Congress from 1959 to 1980. He helped created a political coalition that passed important clean air and clean water legislation, drawing on his roots in Maine.

Site Pages

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Site Page

City of Portland Planning & Urban Development

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Orphanage on Revere Street
by anonymous

An orphanage operated by a Mrs. Oliver on 54 Revere Street in Portland, Maine in 1930.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Becoming Maine: The Votes for Statehood

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine became a state in 1820 after separating from Massachusetts, but the call for statehood had begun long before the final vote. Why did it take so long? Was 1820 the right time? In this lesson, students will begin to place where Maine’s statehood fits into the broader narrative of 18th and 19th century American political history. They will have the opportunity to cast their own Missouri Compromise vote after learning about Maine’s long road to statehood.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Nation to Nation: Treaties and Legislation between the Wabanaki Nations and the State of Maine

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan asks high school students to think critically about and look closely at documentation regarding the Nation-to-Nation relationship between the Wabanaki Tribes/Nations and the State of Maine. This lesson asks students to participate in discussions about morality and legislative actions over time. Students will gain experience examining and responding to primary and secondary sources by taking a close look at documents relating to the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980 (MICSA) and the issues that preceded and have followed the Act.