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LC Subject Heading: Maine--Politics and government--1775-1865

Historical Items

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Item 36142

Appeal for District of Maine to be set off from Massachusetts, ca 1790

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1790 Media: Ink on paper

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Item 102206

William P. Preble to William King regarding Missouri Compromise, Portland, 1820

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1820-03-09 Location: Portland; Bath Media: Ink on paper

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Item 103656

James Bridge to Reuel Williams discussing statehood, Boston, 1819

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1819-06-07 Location: Augusta; Boston Media: Ink on Paper

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Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine's quest for statehood began in the years immediately following the American Revolution. Though the state of Massachusetts consented to the separation in 1819 and Maine would ultimately achieve statehood in 1820, Maine’s split from Massachusetts was not without controversy and was not universally supported by people living in Maine. Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: It is in the best interests of the people of Maine for Maine to become its own state.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Becoming Maine: The Votes for Statehood

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine became a state in 1820 after separating from Massachusetts, but the call for statehood had begun long before the final vote. Why did it take so long? Was 1820 the right time? In this lesson, students will begin to place where Maine’s statehood fits into the broader narrative of 18th and 19th century American political history. They will have the opportunity to cast their own Missouri Compromise vote after learning about Maine’s long road to statehood.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.